'Staycation is the word' - Holiday park will only close two weeks every year

Burgh Castle Marina & Holiday Park requested permission to extend its opening hours. 

Burgh Castle Marina & Holiday Park requested permission to extend its opening hours. - Credit: Google

The Broads Authority has granted a Norfolk holiday park permission to extend its opening dates so it will only be closed two weeks of the year, despite concerns from members.

Burgh Castle Marina and Holiday Park, located south of the Roman fort and village that share its name, is currently open from March 1 to January 31, but at a Friday meeting of the Broads Authority planning committee, received permission to stay open until February 14. 

In a written representation, local borough councillor Adrian Myers said he had “severe reservations” over the application. 

Cllr Adrian Myers at the Great Yarmouth Borough Council Elections 2014. Picture: James Bass

Independent borough councillor for Lothingland Adrian Myers. - Credit: James Bass

He claimed terms and conditions of occupancy there had been broken, and said foreign national workers had been housed in caravans, when they should only be used for holidays.

“The Broads Authority investigated this matter and found it to be true," he said.

The parish council also “strongly object[ed]” to the plans for similar reasons, and for concern over pressure on local services.

A planning officer said concern about non-holiday use of the caravans was an enforcement issue, and was not relevant to the question of opening times. 

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He added: “It’s not considered that the additional two weeks would create substantial strain on local services.”

A condition attached to the permission was that the caravans be used for holiday use only. 

Committee member Bill Dickson said he was “really uneasy” about the plan. 

Yare House on Thorpe Road, Norwich which is home to the Broads Authority. Picture: Simon Finlay

Yare House on Thorpe Road, Norwich which is home to the Broads Authority. Picture: Simon Finlay - Credit: SIMON FINLAY

“I think the applicant - I hate to use this term - is really pushing their luck here,” he said.

“What comes next? When do we get an application to eliminate the close-down period altogether? I just don’t get this, and I’m deeply uncomfortable with it.”

Committee member Leslie Mogford argued, however, that there was increasing demand for year-round holiday provision in the Great Yarmouth area.

“Staycation is the word. People are finding that England is a wonderful place 365 days of the year, and they want to enjoy it.”

He added: “This is not a police state, we should let people run their business as they want to - you can control it through your planning condition.”

Mr Mogford proposed permission be granted, which all members voted for, except for one who abstained.

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