John Fuller re-appointed leader of South Norfolk Council

South Norfolk Council leader John Fuller. Picture: ROSE SAPEY

South Norfolk Council leader John Fuller. Picture: ROSE SAPEY - Credit: Rose Sapey

South Norfolk Council has reselected John Fuller as the authority's leader.

At the South Norfolk Council AGM on Monday, councillors decided on who will lead the council for the year ahead, as well as the chairwoman of the council and deputy chairman. 

The former deputy chairwoman, Florence Ellis, was selected to replace Graham Minshull as the chairman of the council.

Ms Ellis was proposed by Mr Fuller, who described her as a dedicated member.

He added: "We need to show people the best years are ahead and there's nobody better than Florence with her sunny disposition, always with a smile on her face, to lead the district out of lockdown."

South Norfolk Council spent £590,000 in exit packages when it merged its leadership teams with Broad

South Norfolk Council spent £590,000 in exit packages when it merged its leadership teams with Broadland Council. Picture: South Norfolk Council - Credit: Archant

Summing up his time as council chairman Mr Minshull said: "It's been an interesting two years.

"Certainly, when I started as chairman I did not expect to be doing two years, I didn't expect to be the chairman who would introduce Zoom meeting and I didn't expect a lot of things that happened."

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Mr Minshull thanked his successor for being an outstanding deputy. 

James Easter was selected as the deputy chairman for 2021/22.

Selecting his cabinet for the year ahead, Mr Fuller appointed Richard Elliot to customer focus and Alison Thomas into better lives. The rest of the cabinet remains the same.

Also agreed at the meeting was how council meetings will work going forward, after the government announced in-person meetings must resume by May 7.

Councillor Fuller said meetings would take on a hybrid nature, with decision-makers present at the meetings, while the public could continue to watch meetings online.

However, members of the public who wish to contribute to meetings will now have to give two days' notice.

Mr Fuller said the policy would be kept under review as "we need to get the hang of this."

He added: "I think it is accepted we will need to find alternative venues for larger or more controversial meetings and that is baked into the report."