‘It puts your faith back in humanity’ - Two boys enjoy a super send off aboard shiny trucks in Yarmouth.

Edward Worledge school children Jack Rayner and Kallum Lynch (tie) say farewell to school friends to

Edward Worledge school children Jack Rayner and Kallum Lynch (tie) say farewell to school friends to start a new life in the USA. The East Coast Truckers help give the boys a big send off.PHOTO: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

Kind-hearted truckers gave two young brothers a fitting send off on their journey to start a new life in America.

Edward Worledge school children Jack Rayner and Kallum Lynch (tie) say farewell to school friends to

Edward Worledge school children Jack Rayner and Kallum Lynch (tie) say farewell to school friends to start a new life in the USA. The East Coast Truckers help give the boys a big send off.PHOTO: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

Tears and smiles mingled as more than 300 chums lined the street outside their school in Great Yarmouth to wish them well.

As the beaming boys climbed aboard the honking giants many of the youngsters struggled to contain their upset on the last day of the summer term, with the Year 6's also facing change and upheaval.

But for Kallum Lynch, aged 10, and eight-year-old Jack Rayner the move will be even more momentous.

The brothers are off to Los Angeles to be with their aunt Sam Wells following an appeal to pay for their adoption after their mother Jo Lynch died of an inherited form of cancer a year ago.

The 29-year-old died thinking her sons would be looked after by her sister and a fund, Jo's Last Wish, was set up to honour her dying wish, touching hearts across the globe and raising £35,000.

Mrs Wells who sat with Jack in the cab said she had been overwhelmed by the generosity of local people in raising the life-changing sum.

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All the money had been passed to the adoption agency and it was hoped the process would be completed in the next six months, she said.

She said that the offer from East Coast Truckers to treat the boys to a trip was poignant because they had loved watching the convoy with their mother.

'They have been beyond excited, it is just ridiculous,' she said.

'I am just overwhelmed with the generosity of not just people giving money but the time it has taken them too.

'Whether it was a fundraising event or parents being involved or even the pupils, every penny has made a difference.

'It puts your faith back in humanity. This is a tragic story but knowing how much people care has really been a blessing.

'In one way I feel it has been a really long year and we have had multiple hoops to jump through and it has been incredibly stressful making sure we have had everything we need to complete the adoption.

'But they are going to have an amazing life now and I cannot wait to get them home.'

Headteacher at Edward Worlledge Primary School, Dawn Kightley described it as 'a really significant day.'

'It is the culmination of a couple of terms of really hard work raising the money for Jack and Kallum to go to the US to live with their family. The whole community has got behind them and supported them in their move. They will be missed and remembered for a long time and I'm sure the boys will keep in touch.'

The boys have been living with their grandfather Patrick Lynch, but he is too ill to care for them.

Kallum was joined in his truck by Kerri Stebbings, his class teacher when his mother died.

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