“I’ve never experienced anything like it”: Countryfile presenter Richard Taylor-Jones bowled over by tens of thousands of Snettisham knots on BBC’s The One Show

Wildlife film maker Richard Taylor-Jones travelled to the Wash Estuary in Snettisham for Tuesday's e

Wildlife film maker Richard Taylor-Jones travelled to the Wash Estuary in Snettisham for Tuesday's episode of The One Show. Picture: BBC - Credit: Archant

Last night's episode of The One Show travelled to Norfolk where a giant flock of knot birds were captured soaring across the Wash Estuary in Snettisham at high tide.

https://twitter.com/BBCTheOneShow/status/849281597014716416

The estuary is a meeting point between Norfolk and Lincolnshire and wildlife enthusiast Richard Taylor-Jones, who also presents Countryfile and Springwatch, paid it a visit to film the knots in flight.

The wading birds breed in the Arctic and spend their winters in Snettisham where they feed on the mudflats. When the high tide comes in, a truly impressive display can be seen with up to 20,000 birds coming together to form a dense flock in order to protect themselves from predators.

A flock of knot birds take flight at high tide on the Wash Estuary in Snettisham in Tuesday's episod

A flock of knot birds take flight at high tide on the Wash Estuary in Snettisham in Tuesday's episode of The One Show. Picture: BBC - Credit: Archant

Naturalist Taylor-Jones is seen digging graves in gravel pits behind the estuary to capture this flight on camera as the birds move like one enormous creature in the air.

After witnessing the stunning flight, Mr Taylor-Jones, said: 'That is one of the most incredible things I have ever done.


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'Being that close to that many birds - I've never experienced anything like it.'

Jim Scott, from RSPB Snettisham, said: 'All these wading birds are using mud flats to feed on, and as we start to get to high tide it covers up the feeding grounds.

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'This then forces the birds to leave those areas and the mudflats are completely covered, and tens of thousands fly into the pits behind.'

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