I'm not DJ Shazam, says 62-year-old

A 62-year-old man accused of masterminding illegal raves across Norfolk yesterday denied he was the infamous DJ Shazam as he prepares to contest the terms of his anti-social behaviour order.

A 62-year-old man accused of masterminding illegal raves across Norfolk yesterday denied he was the infamous DJ Shazam as he prepares to contest the terms of his anti-social behaviour order.

It is claimed that Christopher Farrow organised a series of raves in the county which have seen revellers trample over private property and leave a trail of destruction at Horsey Gap, a Norfolk coastal beauty spot.

He was originally due to stand trial this month when, if the allegations had been proven, his Asbo banning him from performing amplified music at unlicensed gatherings or transporting equipment to such gatherings would have been made permanent.

Due to complications, his case will not now be heard until October so yesterday Norwich magistrates extended an interim order to prevent such behaviour until the matter is resolved.

His solicitor Anna Morris said he will contest a permanent Asbo on the grounds that although he was present at a number of raves, he was not the organiser and denies being DJ Shazam - the alter ego of the figure behind such gatherings. He also claims the order would be a breach of his human rights.

She said: "Although he provided some sound systems for such events, it is not just to hold him responsible for other people's behaviour."

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Caroline Bolton, acting for North Norfolk District Council, which is bringing the case, said the Asbo only prevents Farrow from behaving in a way which was in any event illegal.

The action comes after a massive rave at Horsey Gap where 1,500 partygoers left behind piles of rubbish including human waste and drug paraphernalia and set a nature trail alight. The repair bill ran into thousands of pounds.

Magistrates had earlier heard claims that Farrow organised at least four major illegal raves in Norfolk including ones at Weeting and Mundford in which large groups of people trespassed on private land to hold parties.

Speaking outside court, Emma Duncan, legal adviser to the council, said: "The purpose of today was to extend the interim order to protect the people of Norfolk from further harassment, alarm and distress."

There have been about 20 major raves in the county this year although in recent weeks they have become less common due to the poor weather.

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