Neglected barns at country hall to be converted into homes

District councillor Fran Whymark raised no objections to the conversion plans at Hemblington Hall

District councillor Fran Whymark raised no objections to the conversion plans at Hemblington Hall - Credit: Brown and Co

Work has started to convert run down outbuildings at a historic Grade II listed country house into brand new homes. 

Broadland District Council has granted approval for the phased development for two barns at Hemblington Hall to be transformed into two homes. 

Planning reports reveal the barns had fallen into a "serious state of disrepair" having been underused for many years.

The façade of Hemblington Hall 

The façade of Hemblington Hall - Credit: Brown and Co

They have been a long-standing item on the district council’s Buildings at Risk register in the village of Hemblington, located eight miles east of Norwich.

District and county councillor Fran Whymark said: "I don't see the development having any adverse impact on the surrounding area or village as a whole.

"I notice there were no objections from local people."

Fran Whymark, Broadland District Councillor

Fran Whymark, Broadland District Councillor - Credit: Archant

Full approval for the homes conversion, which includes installation of sewage treatment plants, parking and landscaping, was granted in March.

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And the new development approval ensures phased Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) payments to be applicable per plot rather than the plots being sold separately or to self build purchasers. 

Hemblington Parish Council, Norfolk Highways and English Heritage raised no objections to the revised plans. 

Hemblington Hall was sold by Brown and Co around two years ago

Hemblington Hall was sold by Brown and Co around two years ago - Credit: Brown and Co

Anthony Howe, parish council vice-chairman, said the outbuildings will be converted into a smaller two-bedroom home and a "more substantial" family home.

He added: "One of the issues we wanted to make sure was that the design was in sympathy with the rest of the locality.

"As a council we had certain suggestions but we did not oppose it in principle. There had been some concern over access but Highways agreed to it. 

"English Heritage were consulted and approved the plans so we had no reason to object."

Mr Howe continued: "The hall is set well away from the rest of the village but I would say it is seen as an asset locally."

One of the rooms inside Hemblington Hall

One of the rooms inside Hemblington Hall. Brown and Co sold the property around two years ago - Credit: Brown and Co

Hemblington Hall, which dates back to the late 17th century, was separated into two homes for many years with two council tax bands.

The previous owners bought the older 17th century part of the property before a full renovation of the front Georgian facade to restore features and connect what was Hall Farm to the historic house.

Property agent Brown and Co then sold the building around two years ago with the application submitted by Matthew Golby and Jenny Wood.

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