'Daily reports' of people getting too close to scared seals on beach

People on the beach standing close to seals

People have been photographed getting too close to seals on Horsey and Winterton beach. This can cause upset to seals and even physical harm to people. - Credit: Friends of Horsey Seals / Jane Eastwood

Children could risk getting crushed by scared seals if beachgoers do not heed warnings to stay away, an animal charity has warned. 

Friends of Horsey Seals [FoHS] has issued another warning urging people to stay at least 10 metres away from seals on Horsey beach, which is the equivalent of the length of a bus or 30ft. 

The charity, which is dedicated to protecting seals, has said it is receiving reports of people getting to close to the seals on a daily basis. 

A statement posted by the charity this week said: "Apart from the fact that someone, maybe a child could get seriously injured if  they are crushed by a group of terrified seals trying to escape into the sea at once, it is also traumatic for the seals.

"Grey seals can weigh between 200 and 350 kilos so this sort of accident is a distinct possibility." 


You may also want to watch:


There are pregnant seals on Horsey beach which could lead to pups being abandoned to starve to death if they are scared away by people getting overly close. 

They give birth in the summer, mostly at sea, but come ashore with their offspring to rest.

Most Read

"Most people respect the seals and stay back and enjoy these beautiful marine mammals who have to come ashore because they are air breathing mammals like us and need to rest," the statement added. 

The fresh warning comes after FoHS recently shared photos of children getting too close to seals on Horsey and Winterton beaches. 

People on the beach standing close to seals

People have been photographed getting too close to seals on Horsey and Winterton beach. This can cause upset to seals and even physical harm to people. - Credit: Friends of Horsey Seals / Jane Eastwood

With an increase in staycations, many more people are heading for Norfolk’s beaches and FoHS feared that it was only a matter of time until someone was seriously injured.

FoHS is a volunteer-run charity that recruits and trains seal wardens from the community for the pupping season between November and mid-January.

In addition, the RSPCA trained FoHS Recue Team works all year round to save sick and injured seals.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter