Horning Hall driveway is the latest link in the Three Rivers Way footpath

Marilyn, left, and Ted Brewster, right, of Horning Hall, walk along the driveway which they have ded

Marilyn, left, and Ted Brewster, right, of Horning Hall, walk along the driveway which they have dedicated as a right of way for a public footpath, linking an ancient footpath from Horning Church to the A1062 near Ludham Bridge, and assisting in the creation of the Three Rivers Way. With them from left, Peter Howe and Anita Turpin from the Three Rivers Way Association; Lesley Marsden, Broads Authority landscape officer; and Caroline Davison, director Norfolk Archaeological Trust. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

The dream to make the beauty of the Broads more accessible to cyclists and walkers is being realised piece by piece.

St James' Hospital, and later Chapel, left, next to Horning Hall at Ludham. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

St James' Hospital, and later Chapel, left, next to Horning Hall at Ludham. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

Click here to view the proposed route of the Three Rivers WayThe owners of Horning Hall have volunteered a section of their driveway to be opened to the public as part of the jigsaw to complete the Three Rivers Way walking, horse riding and cycling route.

The route will ultimately connect Hoveton, Horning, Ludham and Potter Heigham.

The ½ kilometre section of driveway leads from Hall Farm Cottages to the A1062, 500m from Ludham Bridge.

Anita Turpin, secretary of the Three Rivers Way Association and a committee member of the Friends of St Benet's Abbey, said the new right of way is a key link connecting Horning with Ludham Bridge for walkers and cyclists who would otherwise have to travel along the A1062.

She added: 'The footpath from Horning Church to Horning Hall is a very ancient route and has the most beautiful views over the Bure and Ant valleys. When this path is linked to Ludham Bridge it will be very significant for ramblers who will then be able to walk through countryside all the way to St Benet's Abbey.'

The new path was opened as part of a £42,000 power line undergrounding project which will see ½ kilometre of lines, running from the St James Hospital in the grounds of Horning Hall to the pump house on the River Ant, buried underground.

Ted and Marilyn Brewster, owners of Horning Hall, said they had designated the track as a new right of way to assist in the creation of the Three Rivers Way.

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Mr Brewster said: 'The roads are now so fast and dangerous that rights of way are becoming more important for country lovers to enjoy the landscape in a safe and sustainable way.'

The new route is a key link between an ancient footpath running from Horning Church to Horning Hall and the A1062.

An information board commissioned by the Norfolk Archaeological Trust has been erected at the start of the new footpath, which was a route for monks and traders in medieval times.

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