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Pupils return to Norfolk school after week of studying in Sweden

PUBLISHED: 10:04 19 November 2019 | UPDATED: 10:04 19 November 2019

Pupils and staff from Hillcrest Primary in Downham Market travelled to Vasteras, Sweden. Picture: Dave Martin

Pupils and staff from Hillcrest Primary in Downham Market travelled to Vasteras, Sweden. Picture: Dave Martin

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Pupils from a Norfolk primary school have returned to school after spending a week learning with children in Sweden.

Hillcrest Primary pupils spent time in a school in Sweden to get further insight into the type of independent learning Swedish pupils use. Picture: Dave MartinHillcrest Primary pupils spent time in a school in Sweden to get further insight into the type of independent learning Swedish pupils use. Picture: Dave Martin

Eighteen pupils and four staff at Hillcrest Primary in Downham Market returned to school on Monday, November 18 after spending a week in Vasteras, Sweden.

The primary school sent some of its children overseas as part of a new programme of study that is incorporating the Swedish model of learning into the year 5 and 6 curriculum.

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Year 6 pupils had the unique opportunity to study in a Swedish school, with children from both countries learning from one another.

Year 6 pupils at Hillcrest Primary school have adopted a Swedish model of learning, which seems them working more independently. Picture: Sarah HussainYear 6 pupils at Hillcrest Primary school have adopted a Swedish model of learning, which seems them working more independently. Picture: Sarah Hussain

Tracey Wakely, senior leader, said: "Teachers over there are available if the students need it but pupils work independently. They don't teach them in the way that we do here."

The new style of learning, which is in partnership with Norfolk County Council, was introduced to year 5 and 6 pupils in September this year.

The current system sees pupils dedicate three afternoons a week for independent study.

Dave Martin, year 6 teacher, said: "You get away from the traditional spoon-feeding teaching, it's about showing them skills and letting them remember and apply them to the curriculum."

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