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What you need to know about the junior doctors' strike today

PUBLISHED: 12:39 25 April 2016 | UPDATED: 07:27 26 April 2016

Protesting junior doctors giving first aid lessons. Dr Katherine Read gives Claire Robertson, left, a lesson in CPR in Norwich city centre. 
Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Protesting junior doctors giving first aid lessons. Dr Katherine Read gives Claire Robertson, left, a lesson in CPR in Norwich city centre. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2016

Over 1,500 appointments and operations have been cancelled in Norfolk as junior doctors prepare for the first all-out strike in NHS history.

Accident and Emergency sign. Chris Radburn/PA WireAccident and Emergency sign. Chris Radburn/PA Wire

The doctors are refusing to work between the hours of 8am and 5pm on Tuesday and Wednesday - with no emergency care cover.

According to figures from NHS England, 112,856 outpatient appointments and 12,711 planned operations have been cancelled.

In our region, the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (N&N) has cancelled 62 elective operations and 909 outpatient appointments, while the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King’s Lynn is cancelling 329 outpatient appointments. The James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston has cancelled 216 outpatients appointments, one procedure and 10 theatre sessions.

NHS health bosses have set out a plan of action for those needing medical care during the strike. Here are the main points:

A junior doctor on the picket line outside Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge. Photo. Chris Radburn/PA WireA junior doctor on the picket line outside Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge. Photo. Chris Radburn/PA Wire

•Where should I go if I fall seriously ill?

Senior staff will keep A&E departments open to deal with serious and life-threatening conditions. They are likely to be very busy so only people with serious injuries or illnesses should attend. These include broken limbs, severe head injury, loss of consciousness, burns and severe allergic reactions.

•Where should I go if it is not an emergency?

You should visit the local pharmacist or, for more urgent conditions, contact GPs as usual, or call 111. For minor injuries or illnesses, such as cuts and sprains, patients can visit walk-in centres, minor injury units or urgent care centres if they cannot wait for a GP appointment.

In our region these are: Norwich Practices Health Centre in Rouen Road, Norwich; Beccles Hospital; Greyfriars Health Centre in Great Yarmouth; Cromer District Hospital, and North Cambridgeshire Hospital in Wisbech. They will be busier than usual.

•What if I have a planned appointment or procedure?

If you have a planned operation, procedure or outpatient appointment on a day when the strike is taking place, your hospital will contact you if the appointment needs to be rearranged. If you have not been contacted by your hospital you should check their website for additional advice.

•What if I have a long-term health problem?

If you have a long-term health condition or you look after someone else, it is important you know how to contact the relevant specialist carers. If you need regular medication for yourself or someone you care for, be sure to get the prescription from your GP and collect the medicine from your pharmacist.

•What should I do if I’m pregnant?

Make sure you know how to contact your midwifery team if you need help or advice. If you are near your due date, check arrangements with your maternity unit.

•For more information visit the NHS website.

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