Norfolk’s coronavirus infection rate jumps to new high level

The coronavirus infection rate for Norfolk and several of its districts has reached a record high. P

The coronavirus infection rate for Norfolk and several of its districts has reached a record high. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2020

The coronavirus infection rate for Norfolk and several of its districts has passed a new record high.

For the seven-day period ending November 11, more people in the county tested positive for Covid-19 than in any another week since the start of the pandemic.

A total of 1,349 people registered positive results in the week up to November 11, taking Norfolk’s overall infection rate to 148.6 cases per 100,000.

And while the latest seven-day period, ending November 12, is slightly lower, with 1,305 positive cases, two districts saw record high infection rates recorded.

Police conducting coronavirus lockdown patrols in Eaton Park. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Police conducting coronavirus lockdown patrols in Eaton Park. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2020

There appears to be no obvious reason for the recent rise and public health officials are looking at what has caused the increase, what can be done to stem it and the message to put out to people in the county.


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In Norwich, 38 new cases means the city’s rate has also reached its highest so far, standing at 138.7 cases per 100,000 for the same period.

Record-high case rates have also been measured in South Norfolk (207.3), rising from 72.4 in the previous week, while in Great Yarmouth, the rate of 240.6 per 100,000 on the weekend ending November 11 the highest recorded by any local authority in Norfolk. The latest rate here though is 214.4.

The coronavirus infection rate in King's Lynn and West Norfolk has declined for the latest seven-day

The coronavirus infection rate in King's Lynn and West Norfolk has declined for the latest seven-day period. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Archant

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In comparison, the infection rate in Liverpool - under the strongest Tier 3 restrictions until the second national lockdown was introduced - is at 279.1.

Norfolk and Waveney were subject to the most lenient measures in the three-tier system.

The only Norfolk district where the infection rate has decreased is King’s Lynn and West Norfolk 113), declining from 142 cases per 100,000 for the week up to November 5.

Concerns had been raised regarding a rapid rise in the district, which saw a discernible increase in coronavirus infections which were not linked to a particular source.

Cases more than doubled in the week ending October 30, with 26 new positive tests in the areas of Lynn town centre, South Lynn and West Lynn.

However, for the latest period, cases have almost doubled in Breckland, jumping from 70.7 to 136.5.

Coronavirus infection rates are on the rise in several Norfolk districts, including Breckland. Pictu

Coronavirus infection rates are on the rise in several Norfolk districts, including Breckland. Picture: Archant - Credit: Archant

Broadland’s rate has also increased significantly, from 110.1 to 144.5 cases per 100,000 people, while East Suffolk’s has risen from 63.3 to 89.8.

In North Norfolk the latest figure stands at 51.5 having risen from 49.6, but the district still has one of the lowest infection rates in the entire country.

For context, the overall rate for England for the seven days up to November 12 is 271.8 cases per 100,000, up from 247 a week prior.

Number of positive tests in each district for the seven days up to November 12 (previous week in brackets):

Breckland: 191 (99)

Broadland: 189 (144)

Great Yarmouth: 213 (174)

King’s Lynn and West Norfolk: 171 (215)

North Norfolk: 54 (52)

Norwich: 195 (115)

South Norfolk: 292 (102)

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