Norwich man no longer affected by short-sightedness thanks to eye treatment inspired by ancient Chinese idea

Martin Faulks says that he is no longer affected by short-sightedness.

Martin Faulks says that he is no longer affected by short-sightedness. - Credit: Archant

A publishing manager has praised an eye treatment which is believed to be built on a concept created by an ancient civilisation.

Norwich optician Damian Conway, who treated Martin Faulks.

Norwich optician Damian Conway, who treated Martin Faulks. - Credit: Archant

Martin Faulks, 37, of Norwich, said he is no longer affected by short-sightedness after trying a form of sight correction pioneered by the Chinese thousands of years ago.

Mr Faulks was forced to abandon daily contact lenses which he had worn for years due to problems with dry eyes and the resulting discomfort with the lenses.

He was concerned about the long-term effects of laser eye surgery, so Mr Faulks instead turned to Ortho-K, after meeting with Norwich optician Damian Conway.

Ortho-K aims to correct short-sightedness by sleeping with special contact lenses, which are then removed when the wearer wakes up.

Left: Tests are performed on the patient's eyes to reveal (right) a topographical image used to crea

Left: Tests are performed on the patient's eyes to reveal (right) a topographical image used to create special lenses to be worn at night. - Credit: Archant


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It means no lenses or glasses are needed during the day.

'I am naturally very short-sighted, but with Ortho-k my vision is perfect during the day and my sight is good at night,' he said. 'With glasses you lose some peripheral vision but with Ortho-k you just get total freedom.

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'I think this should be the front line for vision correction – it is as easy as cleaning your teeth and leaves you with good vision all day.'

• HOW IT WORKS

Ortho-K works by flattening the cornea (the transparent layer forming the front of the eye) by less than a hair's width with bespoke hard contact lenses.

This idea is believed to originate from the Chinese thousands of years ago.

According to studies, the Chinese tried to combat poor vision by putting tiny bags with sand on the patient's eyes while they slept.

Nowadays Ortho-K is being increasingly recommended by opticians as a form of treatment for short-sightedness and the associated technology is growing.

The lenses worn by Mr Faulks were manufactured at a laboratory in Hastings, Sussex.

After having tests on his eyes (see top image) specially tailored lenses would be produced from a topographical image produced by the tests (see bottom image). The lenses are inserted into the eyes at night, and the gentle pressure of the eyelid ensures a minute change to the contour of the person's eye, thereby providing good vision for the day ahead.

To learn more about Ortho-K visit www.orthoklenses.com

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