Information not necessarily incentives, what Norfolk teens need to get Covid jab

Izzy Whiting and Aimee Mathison have shared their Covid jab experiences. 

Izzy Whiting and Aimee Mathison have shared their Covid jab experiences. - Credit: Izzy Whiting/MAP

Young people in Norfolk have praised their peers for coming forward for their Covid-19 vaccine and say more information, not incentives, could boost those numbers further.

In Norfolk, more than three quarters of 18 to 34 year olds have had at least one dose, amid concerns of rising hospital admissions in that age group.

For first dose percentages, the 18 to 24 group was higher across Norfolk's seven authorities in comparison to those aged 25 to 29. 

Izzy Whiting, 18, has spoken about young people and Covid jabs

Izzy Whiting, 18, said she was impressed and reassured by the numbers who have take the jab up so far, but it was not surprising admissions were rising as society opened up. - Credit: Izzy Whiting

Izzy Whiting, co-chair of Broadland Youth Advisory Board, said she was impressed and reassured by the numbers who have take the jab up so far, but it was not surprising admissions were rising as society opened up. 

The 18-year-old said incentive schemes to encourage young people to get their vaccine were nice but not necessary. 

She said: "The figures are really great considering my age group haven’t been able to receive the vaccine for very long.


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"In some ways, I'm not sure how necessary it is. It is a bit based on stereotypes that young people do not want to get it. 

"For some people, it is not wanting an incentive, it is about wanting the right information and having that information more readily available."

Aimee Mathison. Picture: MAP

Aimee Mathison. Picture: MAP - Credit: MAP

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Aimee Mathison, 17, had both her vaccines by May. 

She said she has had others ask questions ahead of their jabs, adding young people were pulling together to have the vaccine having waited for their turn.

The Breckland Youth Advisory Board member said: "Most people have come up to me. They ask 'did it hurt?' Before you go you think it is going to be a massive needle and it's going to really hurt. 

"I was a bit unsure why I was getting called up at the time. I did not really hesitate with it, it was not just for protecting myself, it was my family and my friends, I love them all to bits.

"We have all had injections before, we have all had vaccinations. It's no different to any other one." 

The A-level student said it gave her confidence in class but like many school pupils isolated at times due to positive Covid case and vaccinations would reduce the inequality of education faced by students.

The CCG is launching a 'Worry Bus' for people who need time and space to discuss their personal circumstances in a non-judgemental environment. 

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