MRI scanner craned away as hospital embarks on £8 million replacement scheme

Getting the MRI machine ready to be lifted out Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY

Getting the MRI machine ready to be lifted out Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY

An MRI scanner that is more than 13 years old has been craned out of Cromer Hospital as part of one of the biggest equipment replacement programmes for Norfolk’s hospitals in recent years.

The removal of the old MRI machine is a part of the £8m project replacing vital imaging equipment P

The removal of the old MRI machine is a part of the £8m project replacing vital imaging equipment Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY

The Norfolk and Norwich Hospitals (NNUH) NHS Foundation Trust’s £8 million project to replace imaging equipment will also see the change-out of three other MRI scanners and a CT scanner at the N&N.

The replacement means patients in north Norfolk who need an MRI scan will now have to go to Norwich until a new machine in installed and commission at Cromer, which is expected to take around three months.

Dr Rayhaan Rahaman, NNUH’s chief of imaging, said: “This significant investment will make a huge difference to patient care with improved imaging and reliability, which will also benefit the trust with research and training.

“Having the latest state-of-the-art scanners will help the trust to recruit and train future radiographers who provide a vital role to help diagnose cancer and a host of other conditions.”

A wall had to be demolished in order to lift out the old MRI machine Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY

A wall had to be demolished in order to lift out the old MRI machine Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY


You may also want to watch:


Work began last week with the reconfiguration of the N&N’s radiology department to allow for the integration of the new CT scanner, which will replace an existing machine there. The trust said this would boost capacity in the hospital’s emergency department and inpatient areas.

The replacement project is being partly funded by a government ‘Aged Assets’ scheme which was announced last year, as well as ‘Adapt and Adopt’ Covid-19 funding.

Most Read

The other machines being replaced are also over 13 years old. The whole project is due to take around 10 months, and the trust said the new equipment would lead to improved quality of imaging, patient safety improvements, efficiencies, and improved patient and staff experience.

If they are needed, additional mobile scanners will be used at NNUH to maintain scanning capacity during the changeover.

The decommissioned MRI machine after being removed Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY

The decommissioned MRI machine after being removed Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY

MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scanners can be used to examine almost any part of the body, including the brain and spinal chord to internal organs and bones and joints.

CT scanners use x-rays to create detailed images of inside the body, and can be used to diagnose a number of conditions including problems with blood flow and cancer.

The MRI machine being lifted out from Cromer Hospital Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY

The MRI machine being lifted out from Cromer Hospital Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY

A decommissioned MRI machine being removed from Cromer Hospital by crane Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY

A decommissioned MRI machine being removed from Cromer Hospital by crane Picture: NEIL DIDSBURY - Credit: NEIL DIDSBURY

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus