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Is poor diet linked to falls for stroke patients?

PUBLISHED: 07:00 09 July 2020 | UPDATED: 07:00 09 July 2020

UEA registered dietitian & Professor of Nutritional Epidemiology Professor Ailsa Welch, UEA research physiotherapist Dr Kath Mares, NNUH stroke consultant Dr Kneale Metcalf, UEA research dietitian Dr Lee Hooper, NNUH dietitians Emma Lines, Kris Howell, Eliza Tassone, Rachael Checkland, Amanda Branford. Picture: NNUH

UEA registered dietitian & Professor of Nutritional Epidemiology Professor Ailsa Welch, UEA research physiotherapist Dr Kath Mares, NNUH stroke consultant Dr Kneale Metcalf, UEA research dietitian Dr Lee Hooper, NNUH dietitians Emma Lines, Kris Howell, Eliza Tassone, Rachael Checkland, Amanda Branford. Picture: NNUH

Archant

More than £12,000 has been awarded to help reduce the number of falls for patients recovering from a stroke.

The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and University of East Anglia have launched a year-long research study to examine whether those who have suffered a stroke are more likely to have a subsequent fall due to their diet.

Eliza Tassone, part of the neurosciences team at NNUH, is working with dietitians Kris Howell, Emma Lines, Amanda Branford and Rachael Checkland, and stroke consultant Dr Kneale Metcalf, as well as UEA researchers, Physiotherapist Dr Kath Mares and Dietitians Dr Lee Hooper and Prof Ailsa Welch on the project, which received a £12,500 grant from NNUH research capability fund.

She said: “If we find out that poor nutritional status is associated with falls and fractures post-stroke, we’ll be able to provide patients with more targeted nutritional interventions and information to potentially reduce the incidence, preventing further hospital admissions and costs to the NHS.”

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