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Headway: the charity helping people in Norfolk overcome brain injuries

PUBLISHED: 17:03 19 July 2018 | UPDATED: 09:25 20 July 2018

Headway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are (L) Services Manager, Chris Clark, Senior Rehabilitation Support Worker, Kelly Sharpe and Commercial Director Daniel Williams. Picture: Ian Burt

Headway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are (L) Services Manager, Chris Clark, Senior Rehabilitation Support Worker, Kelly Sharpe and Commercial Director Daniel Williams. Picture: Ian Burt

Archant 2018

The human brain is the most complex organ in the body and when it gets damaged or injured the effects can be devastating.

Headway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are Rob Baker and (R) Chris O'Shea. Picture: Ian BurtHeadway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are Rob Baker and (R) Chris O'Shea. Picture: Ian Burt

Now, a Norfolk charity which supports people with brain injuries, their families and carers is working to raise awareness and understanding of their effects.

With three centres across the county, Headway Norfolk and Waveney helps people with acquired brain injuries regain their independence and come to terms with their injuries.

At the organisation’s Norwich centre, in Rosebery Road, 
there is a constant focus on 
what clients can do rather than what they cannot.

Chris Clark, a former client who now manages the centre said: “Acquired brain injuries can happen to anybody and everybody is different but we all seem to go on similar journeys.

Headway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured is Mike Palmer. Picture: Ian BurtHeadway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured is Mike Palmer. Picture: Ian Burt

“It’s a very isolating illness people will back away from you because they do not understand what it means.”

A careful programme of Occupational Therapist lead services, classes and events are put on to help people relearn life skills, exercise their brain and regain the independence they may have lost as the result of an injury.

Mike Palmer, 51, who was referred to the charity from the Colman Hospital in 2010 after he was diagnosed with a brain tumour explained how the centre had helped him: “It’s all about trying to get some sort of purpose and focus in your life. When you suffer a brain injury it’s about finding out things.

“A lot of it is to do with getting the brain working again, working on your memory and cognitive skills. It’s not about the answers being right, it’s about getting the brain working.”

Headway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are Rehabilitation Support Worker, Mandy Hathway and Amber Martin. Picture: Ian BurtHeadway is a brain injury charity in Norwich. Pictured are Rehabilitation Support Worker, Mandy Hathway and Amber Martin. Picture: Ian Burt

Commenting on the difference the organisation had made to him he said: “Headway have given me the tools and coping strategies to manage life with a brain injury and I’m passionate about raising awareness of that.”

Daniel Williams, Headway Norfolk and Waveney director, added: “Brain injuries are such a big issue and we know are only scraping the surface. There 
are so many people living with a brain injury and the effects of a brain injury.”

To find out more about the organisation’s services visit: 
www.headway-nw.org.uk


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