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Family of great-grandmother who died after care home attack brings in solicitors

Doreen Livermore lived in Essex but moved to Amberley Hall in King's Lynn in 2009. Photo: Archant

Doreen Livermore lived in Essex but moved to Amberley Hall in King's Lynn in 2009. Photo: Archant

Archant

A family whose mum died after repeated attacks in a care home is looking to take legal action.

Roy Livermore and his sister Valerie Wheddon whose mum Doreen Livermore died six weeks after being pushed over by a resident in a care home. Photo: ArchantRoy Livermore and his sister Valerie Wheddon whose mum Doreen Livermore died six weeks after being pushed over by a resident in a care home. Photo: Archant

Doreen Livermore died on her 89th birthday, six weeks after being knocked to the floor by a resident at Amberley Hall Care Home, King's Lynn.

It was the fourth time the man, who had dementia, had attacked her; and the ninth time he had assaulted staff or residents in the home.

A report by the Norfolk Safeguarding Adults Board, published this month, raised concerns about the ability of the home to manage the risk posed by the resident.

It also found the Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust's dementia team discharged the man too quickly.

Mrs Livermore's son, Roy Livermore and daughter Valerie Wheddon had repeatedly raised concerns with the home before the attack in December 2017.

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They have now instructed solicitors to investigate possible failings to protect their mother.

Medical negligence solicitor Chris Brown, of Hudgell Solicitors, said: ""The report highlights that concern had been raised by a Dementia Intensive Support Team nurse back in August 2017 about the risk posed by the male resident.

"However, he remained in the home and numerous subsequent incidents occurred until he was finally removed after a Mental Health Act Assessment had been completed.

"In cases such as this, it is imperative that agencies and care providers have the appropriate communications and procedures in place to act swiftly and effectively."

The Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust's chief executive Jonathan Warren also had to apologise last week after the Trust's communications manager accidently sent a reporter an internal email, saying the Trust had "got away" with its failings in media coverage of Mrs Livermore's case.

"I think we may have been saved by the death of Terry Jones," he wrote, referring to the Monty Python star who died after a battle with dementia.

The NSFT said it was investigating both the culture around the sending of the email, as well as Mrs Livermore's death.

A spokesman for Amberley Hall said: "We wish to reiterate our sincere regret at what happened and our thoughts remain with the family. We are constrained in what we can say at this present time given that the matter is with our insurers and is following a legal process."

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