Search

Man who had bleed on his brain the ‘size of a fist’ after stroke blogs about recovery

PUBLISHED: 06:30 17 July 2020

Peter Ellis, from Diss, has written a blog charting his experiences of suffering a stroke and the recovery process. Picture: Peter Ellis

Peter Ellis, from Diss, has written a blog charting his experiences of suffering a stroke and the recovery process. Picture: Peter Ellis

Archant

A man who suffered a bleed on his brain “the size of a fist” caused by a stroke is hoping writing about his experience will challenge the stigma around the condition.

Peter Ellis, from Diss, has written a blog charting his experiences of suffering a stroke and the recovery process. Picture: Peter EllisPeter Ellis, from Diss, has written a blog charting his experiences of suffering a stroke and the recovery process. Picture: Peter Ellis

Peter Ellis, from Diss, had a stroke on March 26, 2018, while out in the garden, causing him to lose all use of his left side.

While in hospital he was told by doctors he had sustained a bleed in his brain the size of a fist.

Mr Ellis said: “I was doing some strenuous work in the garden and I remember this sensation just suddenly coming over me. I sat on a bench trying to work out what was happening, when my left arm suddenly just fell to the floor. The first thing I remember thinking bizarrely was ‘I haven’t done my will’.

More: ‘Grit and determination’ - Young man had Covid-19 while in coma

“I can’t remember anything from the ambulance to the hospital where I had further scans that discovered the bleed on my brain. After six days on the ward I deteriorated. The doctors decided to operate, as the second bleed, that happened while I was being observed initially, was life threatening and pressing down on my spinal cord.”

You may also want to watch:

The 60-year-old required two months in hospital and months of rehabilitation, and found he was unable to continue hobbies including gardening and playing the piano.

He used writing as a way to share his own personal journey and to challenge the stigma around the condition in the hope to educate on the recovery process.

More: Hope for bone cancer treatment as UEA makes biggest breakthrough in 40 years

Mr Ellis said: “I was in a sorry state after my stroke – emotionally, physically and spiritually. It’s not been easy on my partner Duncan either, the pressure on him has been huge. After a stroke you feel totally exposed and vulnerable, especially when there are things like going to the toilet, that you just want to do by yourself but can’t.

“My stroke was the scariest experience of my life but I am determined to progress in my recovery and others can too.

“I honestly think the only people who offer any hope for the future are those who have had a stroke and offer examples of recovery.”

More: ‘It would be amazing’ - Family of Kaiden, 7, need £35,000 for vital operation

In the subsequent months from being discharged, Mr Ellis has written about returning home and the “setbacks” which have included being diagnosed with epilepsy as a consequence of the stroke and injuries suffered from falls.

You can read his blog here.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press