Widower raising awareness of ovarian cancer after losing his wife

David and Anne Giess. Picture: David Giess

David and Anne Giess. Picture: David Giess - Credit: Archant

A football agent living in Norfolk is on a mission to raise money and awareness of the terrible disease which claimed the lives of his wife and several other friends and relatives.

David Giess, who lives in Wymondham, lost his wife to ovarian cancer in September 2019, when she was 73.

"And in addition, three friends and relations over the last two years, including one in Wymondham," he said.

It is one of the most common types of cancer in women, mostly affecting those who have been through the menopause, but it can also affect younger women.

Anne Giess was, a former nurse in Essex, was treated for ovarian cancer at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital later in life after they moved to Norfolk.

Anne Giess, right, as a young nurse. Picture: David Giess

Anne Giess, right, as a young nurse. Picture: David Giess - Credit: Archant


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The pair had met at a hospital disco in 1969 when Mrs Giess was a trainee midwife, after she came over from Ireland as a teenager to start her nursing career.

Mr Giess, who has represented Premier League footballers such as Michael Carrick, Joe Cole and Mark Noble in the past, described marrying his wife as the "best signing of my career".

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He added: "She was so fortunate to be treated at the NNUH, such lovely, caring staff from consultants and nurses to ward assistants and volunteers.”

After seeing his wife and so many others suffer with ovarian cancer, Mr Giess has made a point of trying to educate people about the disease to mark Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, which runs throughout March.

David and Anne Giess at a football match between West Ham United and Manchester United. Picture: Dav

David and Anne Giess at a football match between West Ham United and Manchester United. Picture: David Giess - Credit: Archant

He had been putting out flyers in public places prior to lockdown, which gave information about the disease and early signs to watch out for, and is also taking part in the Walk In Her Name step challenge.

He said: "Every year, 295,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer globally. Approximately half of these women will not survive beyond five years.

"March is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and I’m taking 295,000 steps throughout the month to raise funds for life-saving research that will help these women, and the next generation, survive.

"Please help me take 295,000 steps, raise £295 and move research forwards."

To find out more or to donate, visit join.ovarian.org.uk/fundraisers/davidgiess/.

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