Coronavirus: 7 ways to be a more responsible citizen

Coastal towns still extremely busy despite governement instructing people to stay indoor due to Coro

Coastal towns still extremely busy despite governement instructing people to stay indoor due to Corona Virus. Cromer beach Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN - Credit: Archant

As COVID-19 continues to spread across Norfolk, Waveney and the rest of the UK, people are being asked to play their part.

Care workers in Norfolk were told to 'supply your own' soap and hand gel by the county council. Pict

Care workers in Norfolk were told to 'supply your own' soap and hand gel by the county council. Pictured, someone washing their hands. People can help fight the spread of the coronavirus by continuing to regularly wash their hands with soap and water. Picture: Getty - Credit: Getty

On Friday, Boris Johnson ordered pubs, clubs and restaurants to close their doors, while gyms and leisure centres were also told to shut as stricter social distancing measures were enforced.

But following a weekend which saw swathes of people flock to parks and coastal destinations, the prime minister said the government was thinking “very actively” about introducing even tighter rules.

Amid these unfamiliar and unprecedented circumstances, here are nine ways we can act more responsibly and look out for one another.

1) WASH YOUR HANDS

Empty pasta shelves in Sainsbury's on Pound Lane, Norwich, during the supermarket's reserved hour of

Empty pasta shelves in Sainsbury's on Pound Lane, Norwich, during the supermarket's reserved hour of shopping for elderly and vulnerable customers following the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: Sarah Ravencroft - Credit: Sarah Ravencroft

It simply cannot be said enough.

This has been the key piece of advice given by the NHS and World Health Organisation since the severe threat of coronavirus first became apparent.


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Wash your hands regularly with soap and water for about 20 seconds - or the time it takes to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice.

2) Don’t stockpile

Empty pasta shelves in Sainsbury's on Pound Lane, Norwich, during the supermarket's reserved hour of

Empty pasta shelves in Sainsbury's on Pound Lane, Norwich, during the supermarket's reserved hour of shopping for elderly and vulnerable customers following the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: Sarah Ravencroft - Credit: Sarah Ravencroft

Sights of empty supermarket shelves have become commonplace over the past few weeks, with items including pasta, meat and - most notably - toilet rolls increasingly hard to come by.

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But the message from supermarkets has been clear: do not buy more than you need.

In a joint letter penned on March 15, UK retailers reminded shoppers to be considerate so that others do not have to go without essential items.

Scenes of ‘panic-buying’ have left shops largely unable to keep up with demand, but they say “there is enough for everyone if we all work together”.

Food banks are in desperate need of donations amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: Thetford Foodban

Food banks are in desperate need of donations amid the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: Thetford Foodbank - Credit: Thetford food bank

3) Donate to food banks

If you have the financial capacity to do so, donating to food banks is crucial at a time like this.

Many say they are struggling under the strain of coronavirus as donations drop, while a significant portion of their volunteers are in the ‘at risk’ categories, who have been strongly advised to stay at home.

You may not have much to spare, but the most vulnerable may have nothing at all.

Food banks are in desperate need of donations amid the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: David Jones/PA

Food banks are in desperate need of donations amid the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: David Jones/PA Wire - Credit: PA

4) Refrain from visiting elderly and vulnerable relatives

Letters and text messages are being sent to the 1.5 million people in England whoa are most at risk of contracting coronavirus, telling them to stay at home.

That includes those over the age of 70, pregnant women and people with underlying health conditions.

You might be tempted to check on friends and family by popping in but, if they fit into the ‘at risk’ groups, your best bet is picking up the phone or leaving them a care package at the door.

Scammers posing as the Department of Health have been writing to vulnerable people in Norfolk, polic

Scammers posing as the Department of Health have been writing to vulnerable people in Norfolk, police have warned Picture: Getty Images - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

5) Look out for your neighbours

For elderly or vulnerable people who don’t have family nearby, the prospect of being stuck at home for an extended period is incredibly frightening.

Thousands across the country have reacted by posting cards through their neighbours’ doors, which include contact details and services they can offer including shopping and dog walking.

Consider whether those living near you could be in need of a helping hand, while taking care to keep your distance.

Many farm shops remain well-stocked while supermarket shelves are stripped bare during the coronavir

Many farm shops remain well-stocked while supermarket shelves are stripped bare during the coronavirus crisis. Picture: Polly Steggles - Credit: Polly Steggles

6) Support local businesses

This is sure to be a tough time for the vast majority of businesses across the country.

But with supermarkets being stripped bare, there’s arguably never been a better time to support your local bakery, butcher or farm shop.

Social distancing measures mean many are now offering delivery services, so it’s not all doom and gloom.

Second home owners have been warned away from flocking to Norfolk and Waveney's coastal towns such a

Second home owners have been warned away from flocking to Norfolk and Waveney's coastal towns such as Southwold. Picture: Nick Butcher - Credit: Archant

7) Don’t flock to the coast

Norfolk’s coastal towns and villages were packed with visitors over the weekend.

Until now, the government has been keen to promote the importance of getting fresh air during these uncertain times, but pictures of busy parks and beaches have raised concerns.

A family trip to the beach is probably not the best idea at this point in time, while second home owners have also been warned away from swapping densely populated cities for the coast.

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