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Ten alternative providers in frame to take over All Hallows Trust services, protestors told

PUBLISHED: 16:53 28 March 2019 | UPDATED: 17:14 28 March 2019

Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles.
 Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019

Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

Archant 2019

Protestors trying to save a closing healthcare trust have been told 10 alternative providers are in the running to take over its services.

Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles.
 Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

Campaigners gathered outside of Beccles House on Thursday in their fight to save All Hallows Healthcare Trust eight days after its shock closure was announced.

The trust treats some 250 people a day and has around 280 staff.

Armed with placards, the group came together to share their disbelief and anger on the sudden announcement, but also to find out what is next for their loved ones under the care of All Hallows.

Jaime Larter’s father Peter Leggett, 84, from Beccles, suffers from dementia and relies on the trust’s services, including regular home care and day care five times a week.

Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles.
One of the protest organisers Jaime Larter
 Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Protesters against the closure of All Hallows health care trust in Beccles. One of the protest organisers Jaime Larter Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

“I was truly shocked that I hadn’t been told anything – I found out through social media. I am too frightened to think what will happen, I have been putting in all my efforts to save it,” she said.

“My father is scared. He doesn’t want to lose his home. They are family to him, not just a service,”

Mrs Larter added: “We can’t survive as a community without All Hallows.”

Among the protesters was Sandra Bell, whose 32-year-old son Ed is in a persistent vegetative state which means he requires constant medical intervention to be kept alive.

“It is how we are feeling as a family - we thought we had found his home for life. It is, as a family, devastating,” she said.

Talking directly to representatives from the CCG, the distraught mother said: “Ed, my son is a number or a name to you, for us he is our world.”

Cath Byford, deputy chief officer for the Great Yarmouth and Waveney CCG addressed the group, detailing 10 alternative providers could potentially take over the service and assured “nobody will be left stranded”.

“All Hallows were rated inadequate by the CQC and they have jumped up to a good rating. How they have done that approach has cost them a lot of money.”

A public meeting organised by Mrs Larter is to be held this weekend for those affected by the expected closure of a community’s health services.

A petition has also been set up to showcase the public support behind saving the trust, which is also being supported by this newspaper.

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