Children show epilepsy awareness

Kathryn Jackson, head teacher of Roughton Primary school launches her own epilepsy awareness campaig

Kathryn Jackson, head teacher of Roughton Primary school launches her own epilepsy awareness campaign after the death of her son Keir Jackson, from Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy last year. She's picture with members of the School council who'll help her organise ways in which to raise money and awareness in the campaign. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

A primary school talent show organised to raise awareness of epilepsy has raised hundreds of pounds which could help set up a local support group.

Kathryn Jackson, head teacher of Roughton Primary school launches her own epilepsy awareness campaig

Kathryn Jackson, head teacher of Roughton Primary school launches her own epilepsy awareness campaign after the death of her son Keir Jackson, from Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy last year. She's picture with members of the School council who'll help her organise ways in which to raise money and awareness in the campaign. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Head teacher Kathryn Jackson hosted the event at St Mary's Endowed Primary School after losing her son, Keir, to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) last year, aged just 22.

Jasmine Platten and Emily Bliss performing a gynmastics display.

Jasmine Platten and Emily Bliss performing a gynmastics display. - Credit: Archant

Around £450 was raised from the entrance into the talent show, which included Irish dancing, gymnastics and a piano recital, as well as hot cross buns made by the children.

Izzy Barrell and Aimee Sadler singing 'Call me Maybe'

Izzy Barrell and Aimee Sadler singing 'Call me Maybe' - Credit: Archant

Ms Jackson said: 'It was really brilliant, it was a good family and community day and I am really impressed with the parents and children who really got into the spirit, it was completely the kids' show.

'It was really satisfying, gratifying and humbling.'


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Before the show, Ms Jackson gave a talk about epilepsy and, with help from the students, she demonstrated how the brain looks when having a seizure.

After the children had impressed everyone with their skills, they went back to class while Ms Jackson gave a presentation to the adults.

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Ms Jackson said: 'Considering we are only a school of 57, £450 is a huge amount, it's important that we have raised awareness too.'

It is estimated that SUDEP affects one in every 1,000 people with epilepsy. There is no way of predicting who will be affected. However, some people with epilepsy have a higher risk than others.

Not taking epilepsy medicines as prescribed, being a young adult (in particular male), having seizures when alone, and drinking large amounts of alcohol are all believed to increase the risk.

Ms Jackson hopes raising awareness of the condition's warning signs and setting up a support group in north Norfolk could help prevent more deaths.

Ms Jackson added: 'I wrote to (MP) Norman Lamb asking to help spread awareness and I've received a letter back saying he's contacted the Secretary of State for help as well.'

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