Art exhibition boost for brain injury patients in Norwich

The Art of Recovery exhibition will showcase work by patients who have been treated for complex neur

The Art of Recovery exhibition will showcase work by patients who have been treated for complex neurological disabilities at Jubilee House in Norwich, which is run by Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust , as well as clients from brain injury charity Headway. - Credit: Archant

They are colourful artworks that would grace many galleries across Norfolk.

The Art of Recovery exhibition will showcase work by patients who have been treated for complex neur

The Art of Recovery exhibition will showcase work by patients who have been treated for complex neurological disabilities at Jubilee House in Norwich, which is run by Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust , as well as clients from brain injury charity Headway. Patient Berris Ripley - Credit: Archant

A specialist rehabilitation unit for patients that have suffered brain injuries is set to receive a splash of colour - thanks to people who have been treated for complex neurological disabilities in Norwich.

Dozens of paintings, drawings, photos and tapestries, created by patients of Jubilee House in Unthank Road, will go on display from tomorrow to brighten up the facility run by Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust (NCH&C).

The Art of Recovery exhibition will showcase work by patients who have been treated at the unit, which is part of the Colman Centre for Specialist Rehabilitation Services, as well as clients from brain injury charity Headway.

Officials praised the standard of work from the project, which has helped unlock the creativity of people who have suffered trauma to their heads or a brain haemorrhage.


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The 31 pieces include a collection of brain scans called 'The Core of Me', which run alongside a narrative about the personality of each patient. The exhibition has been put together over the past year and will remain on display permanently in Jubilee House for patients, their families and trust staff to enjoy.

Paul Fisher, clinical psychologist at Jubilee House, said the idea came about after the NHS trust visited Headway to see the therapeutic benefits of art for patients and presented an opportunity to make the facility a more friendly and welcoming environment for patients carers and staff.

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'Some of the pieces are very emotive and some are extremely thought-provoking. I believe the collection represents many of the different feelings people may experience during their recovery. Some of the pieces show some of the difficulties and challenges of living with a complex disability whilst others seem to touch on themes of hope or humour.'

'What is especially interesting is that a number of the artists we are featuring were not aware they had an artistic flair before their brain injury, but have developed those skills since. It shows that people are able to grow, change and develop new talents and abilities as part of their recovery from a brain injury, which is incredibly important to the work that we do,' he said.

Jubilee House is the home of the community health trust's outreach service for neurological rehabilitation to help people with brain damage and non-progressive neurological conditions to develop the skills needed to help them enjoy the best possible quality of life.

Angela Page, occupational therapist from Headway Norfolk and Waveney, said the artwork on show was only a small sample of the work created at their art sessions.

'At the centre, clients of all abilities, are enabled to explore their creativity with the help of support workers, and for many, art has given them a sense of purpose and a reason to get up in the morning.

'Daily life can be full of frustrating challenges for someone with a brain injury and, therefore, being able to be creative in a friendly, relaxed and supportive environment, empowers them to be able to focus on a different type of challenge. We hope that the paintings give patients, relatives and staff pleasure whilst they spend time at Jubilee House, and hopefully they will feel inspired to pick up a paintbrush and experience for themselves the therapeutic value of art,' she said.

The Art of Recovery exhibition received backing from NCH&C's charitable fund for the framing and display of the artwork.

Have you got a health story? Email adam.gretton@archant.co.uk

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