Great Yarmouth drugs gang sentenced to almost 16 years

Top row (left to right): Jason Colman was sentenced to three years and nine months imprisonment; Jac

Top row (left to right): Jason Colman was sentenced to three years and nine months imprisonment; Jacqueline Dunne was sentenced to three years and nine months imprisonment. Bottom row (left to right): Jeanette Wise was sentenced to 21 months imprisonment; Paul Mason was sentenced to 26 months imprisonment; Wandile Mirazi was sentenced to five years imprisonment. Picture: Norfolk Constabulary - Credit: Archant

A man who admitted his part in the supply of class A drugs in Norwich and Great Yarmouth has been sentenced to five years detention.

Wandile Mirazi, 20, was the 'regional manager' of gangs which supplied class A drugs in the Riverside area of Norwich in April last year and in the North Quay area of Yarmouth between December 2013 and April 2014.

Mirazi, formerly of Albany Gardens, Colchester, who has previously admitted conspiracy to supply a class A drugs in Norwich and Yarmouth as well as a separate drugs supply offence, appeared at Norwich Crown Court yesterday where he was sentenced alongside five other members of the Yarmouth gang.

Jacqueline Dunne, 48, Jason Colman, 49, Jeanette Wise, 51 and Paul Mason, 49, were sentenced to a total of almost 11 years after previously admitting conspiracy to supply class A drugs in Yarmouth last year.

The gang were charged with conspiracy to supply class A drugs in the town following a four-month police crackdown codenamed Operation Debenture.


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Andrew Shaw, prosecuting, said: 'During a 14 day period in March and April police had these defendants under observation.'

The defendants were observed in and around the North Quay area of the town as part of the police operation which involved 'organised street level Class A drug dealing'.

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The observations centred around individuals involved in the supply of cocaine with the property where Dunne lived at Langworth House in North Quay and Wise's nearby address at North Quay identified as the main bases involved in the supply of drugs.

The gang was sentenced by Judge Katharine Moore to:

- Dunne, of North Quay, Yarmouth, to three years and nine months imprisonment.

- Colman, 49, of Alpha Road, Yarmouth, to three years and nine months imprisonment.

- Wise, 51, of North Quay, Yarmouth, to 21 months imprisonment.

- Mason, 49, of Nelson Road North, Yarmouth, to 26 months imprisonment.

- Kern, 53, of Orchard Close, Caister-On-Sea, was sentenced to 10 months imprisonment suspended for 21 months.

Ian James, for Mirazi, said he pleaded guilty and in the 'early part of 2014 he was recruited to become involved in this activity'.

Michael Clare, for Dunne, said she had a long standing heroin addiction and was feeding her own habit and made 'absolutely no money whatsoever' from the offence.

Mr Clare, for Colman, said he has had difficulties with drugs and 'knows he needs to get completely clean of all class A drugs'.

Jonathan Morgans, for Wise, said she pleaded on the basis of permitting her premises to be used for the supply of drugs for a two day period in order to 'pay off a £90 drugs debt'.

Jonathan Goodman, for Mason, said he was 'caught up in this enterprise because he was a long standing and vulnerable class A drug user'.

Mr Goodman, for Kern, said his client was seen by police on three or four days buying drugs and was 'feeding his own habit'. Speaking after the case, Detective Constable Kerrie Atkin, who took part in Operation Debenture, said: 'The operation was launched in order to target the sale of Class A drugs, namely crack cocaine and heroin, within Great Yarmouth.

This result reiterates that we will not tolerate any kind of activity around the dealing of drugs in the town or indeed the county as a whole.

'This operation has taken a large number of drug dealers off the streets of Yarmouth and Norfolk Constabulary will continue to target such individuals to ensure our communities remain safe.'

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