‘We need to instill a sense of pride’- How the council plans to clean up Great Yarmouth’s streets

One of the ideas being floated by the council is volunteer task-forces to help with beach cleans. By

One of the ideas being floated by the council is volunteer task-forces to help with beach cleans. Byline: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan

A council's call to arms about 'overflowing litter bins' and a 'general lack of pride in the local area' is expected to come into force in advance of the busy summer season.

Penny Carpenter, Chair of Great Yarmouth's Environment Committee Pic: Norfolk County Council.

Penny Carpenter, Chair of Great Yarmouth's Environment Committee Pic: Norfolk County Council. - Credit: Norfolk County Council

Great Yarmouth Council's Environment Committee, which is meeting on February 19, will outline the challenges facing "litter hotspots" across the borough's sea-front, market place and shopping hubs.

It will also stress the need for cleanliness in order to maintain tourism - a crucial part of the borough's economy.

The plan, outlined in a report to the environment committee, is to focus on "small actions that can have big impacts", such as setting up volunteer task-forces and raising awareness about the issue.

The report said: "Working with the Town Centre Partnership (TCP), officers identified a dozen known hotspots, which have a number of issues associated with litter, dog and human faeces, miss-use of waste bins, commercial waste building-up and a general lack of pride in the area.

The beach huts in Gorleston are one of the borough's top haunts over the summer period. Picture: Gre

The beach huts in Gorleston are one of the borough's top haunts over the summer period. Picture: Great Yarmouth Borough Council - Credit: Archant

"The aim, through raising awareness, is to instil a sense of pride in the place and encourage greater social responsibility which appeals to businesses, residents and visitors to help keep the borough clean and tidy".


You may also want to watch:


The report also mentions the problems with seagulls, stating that sea-front bins must be made "gull proof", and floats the idea that "smart" or sensor-fitted bins could help alleviate the nuisance they are liable to cause.

Last summer, Great Yarmouth residents were dismayed over the level of rubbish along the sea-front.

One former resident, Jamie Blackstone, had visited the town in June 2019 with his family.

Most Read

He began taking pictures of the sea-front because he was "so horrified by what he encountered".

Mr Blackstone said at the time: "When are the council going to take responsibility? They knew with temperatures reaching a yearly high the beaches would be full this weekend, and they either weren't prepared or simply don't care."

Back then, Chairman of the Environmental Committee Penny Carpenter had stressed that "there is absolutely no excuse for litter, whether on the beach or elsewhere."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus