Great knot all the way from Australia at Titchwell Marsh in Norfolk

The great knot is the bird in the centre with the dense black spotting on the breast and sides. Pict

The great knot is the bird in the centre with the dense black spotting on the breast and sides. Picture: Paul Eele - Credit: Archant

It's definitely knot the kind of thing you normally expect to see when you scan the marshes with your binoculars.

Twitchers flock to Titchwell to see the Great Knot. Picture: Paul Eele

Twitchers flock to Titchwell to see the Great Knot. Picture: Paul Eele - Credit: Archant

A bird which belongs on the other side of the world has landed at a Norfolk naature reserve.

Twitchers are flocking to the RSPB's Titchwell Marsh Reserve, near Hunstanton, in the hope of glimpsing a great knot.

The wader normally breeds in north-eastern Siberia, migrating south to Australia for the winter.

But on Wednesday, Brancaster-based birder Chris Booth spotted one through his scope on the fresh marsh at Titchwell.


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The sighting is just the fifth ever to be recorded in Britain and only the second to have been made in Norfolk.

RSPB reserve warden Paul Eele said around 200 people came to Titchwell within hours of the sighting, with keen twitchers setting off from as far as Edinburgh and Midlands.

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Tripods and telescopes lined the floodbank, as birders scanned the shoreline for a glimpse of what is being dubbed a 'mega' sighting.

'The bird is still there are far as I'm aware,' said Mr Eele. 'It was still around this morning, but it's been a bit mobile and elusive.

'The bird is showing well. It's with a flock of red knots on the fresh marsh. It's only the fifth record for Britain.

'It winters in Australia then heads up to Siberia, passing through China and Japan to breed, so it should be on the other side of the world.'

Titchwell is better-known for the knot - as oppossed to great knot - which sometimes form large flocks on the reserve. Other visitors to the marsh include the bittern, marsh harrier and bearded tit.

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