Girl who was told she may never walk prepares for the Special Olympics

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant - Credit: Archant

For most of her life, Katie Warrent's parents told her not to run.

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant - Credit: Archant

The 22-year-old is one of just a handful of people in Norfolk with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RTS), meaning her bones can dislocate easily.

That meant concerned parents Joanne and Stephen Warrent feared exercise would put their daughter at risk of injury.

But, Miss Warrent, from Norwich, has beaten all odds and will be travelling to Sheffield to take part in the Special Olympics on August 12.

Joanne Warrent said: 'We were told that she wouldn't walk or talk and wouldn't be able to feed properly or eat. I had my son who was how they say 'normal' but to have Katie it was totally different but it has been worth every moment.

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant

Katie Warrent preparing to take part in the Special Olympics. Photo: Archant - Credit: Archant


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'She achieves in life everyday, every day she is so happy. We don't discuss disability with her, no one else does, she doesn't think she's different from anyone else.'

Stephen Warrent, Katie's father said: 'She has broken a lot of boundaries that we never thought she would do. She has been a poster girl for the centre and to go to Sheffield is just phenomenal.'

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For two decades Katie has been attending the Hamlet Centre in Norwich, with an opportunity to learn new skills and socialise, and it was the staff at the centre who introduced her to Athletics.

Katie is part of a team of almost 30 competitors who will take part in a range of events at the Special Olympics next month.

Nicola Fish, chairman for the Special Olympics Norfolk said: 'It is great to see them being able to compete against other people and the joy they get at winning a medal, the joy they get even at regional levels; we have athletes who have won a medal and to see them win is one of the first times they have been successful in anything.'

'One competitor who won in the Suffolk regionals was so happy with their achievement that they did not take off their medal for a week,' she added.

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