Funds awarded to rejuvenate Great Yarmouth’s historic Rows

Great Yarmouth Rows. COLIN TOOKE COLLECTION

Great Yarmouth Rows. COLIN TOOKE COLLECTION - Credit: Archant

They are the narrow historic passageways that form the back bone of Great Yarmouth.

Yarmouth's historic rows will recieve �50,000. Photo: GYBC

Yarmouth's historic rows will recieve �50,000. Photo: GYBC - Credit: Archant

The Rows are unique to the town and now a project which seeks to enhance and celebrate the medieval network is getting underway.

Great Yarmouth Preservation Trust, a charity, is leading a £50,000 investment project to initially improve four of the narrow alleyways, each with their own historic names and distinct characters.

People are being invited to share their ideas, memories and photos to form part of the scheme.

The trust's chairman Bernard Williamson said it had been a long held ambition to enhance the medieval Rows and reinstate their names.

Yarmouth's historic rows will recieve £50,000. Photo: GYBC

Yarmouth's historic rows will recieve £50,000. Photo: GYBC - Credit: Archant


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He added: 'These medieval thoroughfares are a unique part of the borough's rich cultural history – a remnant of Old Yarmouth that still plays a part in everyday life.

'Some fantastic surveying and research has already happened and we are overjoyed to now have the investment to make a start by improving four of the Rows, chosen because of their historic interest, condition and completeness.'

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Chairman of the borough council's economic development committee, Barry Coleman, said the enhancements offer the opportunity to re-capture The Rows vibrancy for the 21st century.

He added: 'The Rows were once described as the town's veins, flowing into the arteries – the three principal historic streets – which in turn flow into the town's beating heart, the Market Place.'

The project is part of Making Waves Together, a wider partnership project led jointly by Great Yarmouth Borough Council and Waveney District Council, and funded by the national Great Place Scheme, which is seeing communities and organisations in both areas work together to boost the cultural offer and drive cultural re-imagination as a way of supporting success in the seaside towns.

The Rows Project is also a key area of work under the Town Centre Masterplan, which has approved earlier in the year, and aims to regenerate the town centre and help enhance links between different central areas.

People invited to a special workshop on Wednesday, August 16 to share their ideas, memories and photos at St George's Theatre from 11am to 1pm.

People are invited to come along to find out more and share any photos, stories or memories relating to the Rows. The preservation trust will be recording oral histories and scanning photos to create a database of information.

The trust will speak with attendees to find out what the Rows mean to them, what they think of them currently and what improvements they would like. Improvements might include lime-washing walls, masonry repairs, additional pest control measures and potentially paving and lighting enhancements.

A key element of the project is to create exciting community-led artistic interpretations to enhance these four Rows.

The Rows were originally named after well-known figures in the town.

The four identified for enhancements are:

• Row 38, Ferrier's Row, links Howard Street to the Market Place. It is named after the Ferrier family, who lived on the corner. Richard Ferrier was bailiff in 1691.

• Row 46, Sewell's Row, links Howard Street to the Market Place. It is named after the Sewell family who ran a grocer's store on the corner in the 18th and 19th centuries. Their most famous member is Anna Sewell, author of Black Beauty.

• Row 90, Old Hannah's Row, links Middlegate Street to King Street. It is named after former resident John Hannah, who murdered his wife in 1813. After being found guilty, he became the last person to be publicly hanged at North Denes.

• Row 93, King the Baker's Row, links Middlegate Street to

King Street. It is named after the King's Head

Pub and Rivett the Baker's Shop, which stood on the corner.

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