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Freed Lotto lout: I've learned my lesson

PUBLISHED: 11:57 26 June 2006 | UPDATED: 11:05 22 October 2010

CHRIS BISHOP

Lotto Lout Michael Carroll pledged to launch a TV career as he was released from prison this morning.

The £10m jackpot winner was jailed for nine months in February for affray and breaching a drug testing and treatment order.

Lotto Lout Michael Carroll pledged to launch a TV career as he was released from prison this morning.

The £10m jackpot winner was jailed for nine months in February for affray and breaching a drug testing and treatment order.

After being released from Ranby Prison, Notts, at 6.30am, Carroll was on his way to Downham Market, where he was due to be interviewed for an American TV station.

His publicist Sean Boru said he intended to turn over a new leaf after his latest spell behind bars.

"The first thing Michael said to me was Sean, I really, really have learned my lesson," he said.

"I really want to become a celebrity and do it properly. I want people to know I've changed.

"I'm still going to be as naughty as I ever was but not as nasty. The world's going to see a different Michael Carroll."

An autobiography – called Be Careful What You Wish For – is set to be published later this year.

Mr Boru said it would focus on the true story of where most of the £9.5m jackpot, which Carroll won in 2002, had been spent.

"A lot of money's been spent on drugs, a lot has been spent on cars and booze," he added. "But a lot more has been given away."

Carroll, 23, hit the headlines when he turned up to collect his winnings wearing the electronic tag he had been sentenced to wear for being drunk and disorderly.

He became the richest person ever to have an ASBO, – one for randomly shooting out car windows with a catapult, one for holding banger races in the back garden of his house on the outskirts of Swaffham.


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