Four stabbed during brawl with brothers

Four people were stabbed after two brothers gate-crashed a family birthday party, Norwich Crown Court heard yesterday. Robert Beaman, 18, of Kells Acre, Geldeston, and James Beaman, 22, of Fleeters Hill, Hingham, both admitted affray on July 29 and 30 last year.

Four people were stabbed after two brothers gate-crashed a family birthday party, Norwich Crown Court heard yesterday.

Robert Beaman, 18, of Kells Acre, Geldeston, and James Beaman, 22, of Fleeters Hill, Hingham, both admitted affray on July 29 and 30 last year.

Matthew Gowen, prosecuting, said that it was Rachel Dunnett's 18th birthday, her brother Richard's 21st birthday and a celebration for her sister who was going to New Zealand. Music and alcohol were provided.

The brothers were not invited but attended anyway claimed they had been told about the celebration by a third party. James had pitched a tent next to Miss Dunnett's and during the course of the evening trouble had flared outside the tent. It was believed the brothers had taken drinks from the marquee to the tent.

At 2.30am Miss Dunnett heard a noise outside her tent and found James outside with a knife. She tried to get it off him but he would not let her have it.

Sam Drewery, who had been playing music all night, was aware of the difficulties with the Beamans.

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Robert was aggressive towards him and was becoming increasingly agitated.

James made slashing gestures with the knife towards Mr Drewery's neck. Mr Drewery suffered cuts to his neck and was also stabbed in the back. In the brawl which followed three other men suffered stab wounds in the back, arm and buttock.

When interviewed by police, James said that he became claustrophobic in the tent and when he came out was confronted by a man with a baseball bat. Robert said he pulled a knife out in self-defence and claimed his brother had been threatened.

Jonathan Mitchell, defending, James said trouble began after a considerable amount of alcohol had been drunk on all sides.

David Wilson defending Robert said he was a man of previous good character and that there had been an element of self-defence. He had overreacted.

James Beaman was sent to prison for six months and Robert, who Recorder Anthony Bate said: “played a secondary role” was given six months detention in a young offenders institution suspended for 18 months; ordered to do 180 hours unpaid work for the community and given an 18 month supervision order.