Former Met copper David Dugmore, from Downham Market, shares his memorable moments in new book

David Dugmore, of Downham Market, with his book he has written about his time in the Metropolitan Po

David Dugmore, of Downham Market, with his book he has written about his time in the Metropolitan Police. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Experience the most memorable events of Britain's past through the eyes of a London copper.

David Dugmore when he was a probationer policeman in the Met in 1967. Picture: Courtesy of David Dug

David Dugmore when he was a probationer policeman in the Met in 1967. Picture: Courtesy of David Dugmore - Credit: Submitted

David Dugmore joined the met police in 1967 aged 19, and climbed up the ranks from police constable, to detective sergeant and finally retired as a chief superintendent in 1997.

In his book, Memorable Moments of a Met Copper 1967 - 1997, Mr Dugmore relays his experience of some of the biggest events that have shaped Britain's history.

From the coal miners' strike in 1984 to the IRA bombing in Canary Wharf in 1996, Mr Dugmore had also dealt with the death of his colleague Nina Mackay and the 1981 Brixton riots.

'I have never written a book before.' He said. 'My daughters had a very persuasive way of encouraging me to write this book.

David Dugmore when he was a policeman in the Met 30 years ago. Picture: Courtesy of David Dugmore

David Dugmore when he was a policeman in the Met 30 years ago. Picture: Courtesy of David Dugmore - Credit: Submitted

'They said I needed something to keep the grey matter going or I'll go stir crazy.'

Mr Dugmore, who now lives in Downham Market, experienced a knock back to his health this time last year after being diagnosed with bone cancer.

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After six months of chemotherapy and having to relearn how to walk, he was told he was fit enough to go home.

Now that he is on the mend, 69-year-old Mr Dugmore is hoping his book will act as a reminder of who he is and what his life had been like for not only the public but also his family and especially his grandchildren.

David Dugmore, of Downham Market, with his book he has written about his time in the Metropolitan Po

David Dugmore, of Downham Market, with his book he has written about his time in the Metropolitan Police. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

He said: 'With my three young grandsons, in 20 years they will know the name but not anything about me. One way to get over that is to write this book.'

After almost three months of writing his book, Mr Dugmore presented it to four independent publishers before it was taken up by Melrose Books in Ely.

After publishing costs, Mr Dugmore said all proceeds from the book will go to cancer charity Macmillan.

'They do a fantastic job in difficult circumstances.' He added.

Following retirement, Mr Dugmore moved from Brentwood, in Sussex, to Downham Market with his wife Paula in 2002 before she passed away six years later.

His children, Danielle Dickson, Dominique Sanchirico and Damien Dugmore also live closeby.

'It is nice and peaceful, what I call a good old English countryside.' He said.

Mr Dugmore's book can be purchased from Amazon or from the Melrose Books website.

Coal miners' strike, 1984-1985

On the coal miners' strike, David Dugmore writes: 'While there were hard-line factions within the mining fraternity, I found the vast majority of miners to be honest, hardworking and down to earth people who had little or no interest in getting involved in violent confrontation.

'Having policed many of the picket lines at different collieries during the dispute, the miners came over as genuine, good humoured and rational individuals who shunned intimidation or civil disorder.

'While they were cajoled into going on strike in the first instance on the pretext of saving their industry and preserving jobs, it didn't take long before most miners realised that the true objectives were politically orientated.

'The ultimate failure of the miners' strike was as much down to the determination of the prime minister, Mrs. Thatcher, as it was to the miners themselves.

'Suffice to say, that during the period of the strike when I performed duty at many of the collieries, I never encountered any real unpleasantness. I appreciate there were certain locations where violent disorder did arise, but most of those were restricted to known pockets of political descent.'

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