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Families pay gratitude to EACH Quidenham support as new £10m nook hospice build begins

PUBLISHED: 06:30 18 November 2017

Bradley Jackson, 12, from Norwich, who is cared for by EACH staff from Quidenham hospice. He is pictured with his mother Michelle Jackson. Picture: EACH

Bradley Jackson, 12, from Norwich, who is cared for by EACH staff from Quidenham hospice. He is pictured with his mother Michelle Jackson. Picture: EACH

EACH

Work has started on the £10m EACH nook hospice in Framingham Earl, which will replace Quidenham. Two families have spoken of their support for EACH.

Bradley Jackson, 12, from Norwich, (right)  during a Christmas visit through EACH. From left,  Bradley's older sister Leah Billard, 20, who is holding her daughter Ava Boorman, Bradley Smith and his mother Michelle Smith. Picture: EACHBradley Jackson, 12, from Norwich, (right) during a Christmas visit through EACH. From left, Bradley's older sister Leah Billard, 20, who is holding her daughter Ava Boorman, Bradley Smith and his mother Michelle Smith. Picture: EACH

Bradley Jackson, 12, suffered brain damage after a major seizure when he was just a few days old.

He was later diagnosed with mitochondrial cytopathy – a group of disorders that affect energy production.

When he was three-years-old he was diagnosed with Dravet syndrome – a rare genetic epileptic dysfunction of the brain, which requires medication.

He does live at home but to help the family he has overnight stays at Quidenham.

Despite his improved quality of life, Bradley has several seizures a day, global developmental delay, is registered blind and cannot sit, stand or speak.

His mother Michelle Jackson, said: “When we first visited Quidenham we were made to feel very welcome and the staff realised I found it very hard to leave Bradley in the care of anyone else. All my children were still living with me so we went as a family.

“Bradley used to have home nursing and had visits from a play therapist. I also had time with a family support worker. I now find it most helpful when Bradley has overnight stays as I need to catch up on sleep and have some time to myself, and have a chance to lead a normal life for a few days.”

Daisy Newman, eight, from Carlton Colville, who has cerebral palsy, being cared for by Quidenham hospice staff. She has been cared for by EACH for the past six years. Picture: EACHDaisy Newman, eight, from Carlton Colville, who has cerebral palsy, being cared for by Quidenham hospice staff. She has been cared for by EACH for the past six years. Picture: EACH

Quidenham home support for Carlton Colville family

Another youngster supported by Quidenham staff is Daisy Newman, eight, from Carlton Colville, near Lowestoft.

She has cerebral palsy and various other conditions meaning her life is currently confined to the family home.

But EACH staff visit the eight-year-old, her parents and sister Gracie, 11, in Carlton Colville to offer care and support for six hours twice a month for the past six years.

Mr Newman said: “If it wasn’t for EACH we wouldn’t have a break...Daisy struggles with journeys in the car and travelling to Quidenham has proven difficult – it’s just too far out.

“Daisy will be able to visit the nook as it’s in a less remote area. We’re looking forward to having her explore more than her own house. The interaction she’ll have with others will help her explore her understanding of life.

“The facilities at the nook will be perfect for Daisy, too. Hydrotherapy is something that’s helped her to relax and have a moment’s respite from the tightness of her muscles. We’re currently not receiving hydro and we’d love for Daisy to have access to such a wonderful facility.”

Parents Wayne and Joanne Newman with their eight-year-old daughter Daisy Newman (left) who receives care from EACH staff from Quidenham hospice and their other daighter Gracie, 11, at their home in Carlton Colville. Picture: EACHParents Wayne and Joanne Newman with their eight-year-old daughter Daisy Newman (left) who receives care from EACH staff from Quidenham hospice and their other daighter Gracie, 11, at their home in Carlton Colville. Picture: EACH

How to support the nook appeal

From buying a Christmas decoration to a virtual brick - there are many ways to support the nook appeal.

■The nook friends group - The volunteer fundraising group wants people to save loose change in collection boxes this winter. Contact Judith Sykes on 01508 494873 or email judyannsykes@btinternet.com.

■Buy a brick - People can buy a brick for £20, £100, £500 or £1,000 in memory of a loved one for a virtual wall. Visit www.each.org.uk/buyabrick

■My £10 challenge - People can give up something that will save £10. Participants need to photograph themselves showing how they saved the money, sharing it on social media via #My10pound and donating via www.each.org.uk or by texting NOOK10 £10 to 70070.

■EACH Butterfly baubles - Intu Chapelfield in Norwich is selling 2,017 baubles for £30 or £35.

■To help with any form of fundraising call 01953 666767 or email norfolk@each.org.uk.

The logo for the nook appealThe logo for the nook appeal

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