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Rare dragonfly spotted at natural beauty spot in Norfolk

PUBLISHED: 06:49 07 August 2020 | UPDATED: 16:51 07 August 2020

The southern migrant hawker dragonfly has been spreading from Europe through the southeast of the country, with several males seen recently at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Thompson Common. Photo: Mark Rayment

The southern migrant hawker dragonfly has been spreading from Europe through the southeast of the country, with several males seen recently at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Thompson Common. Photo: Mark Rayment

Mark Rayment

A rare species of dragonfly has been making its home in Norfolk after several sightings at a natural beauty spot.

The southern migrant hawker dragonfly has been spreading from Europe through the southeast of the country, with several males seen recently at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Thompson Common. Photo: Mark RaymentThe southern migrant hawker dragonfly has been spreading from Europe through the southeast of the country, with several males seen recently at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Thompson Common. Photo: Mark Rayment

The Southern Migrant Hawker Dragonfly was captured by a nature-lover at Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Thompson Common, near Watton.

Thompson Common is one of the most important sites in the county for dragonflies and damselflies, where 19 species have been recorded as breeding or possibly breeding.

Nick Acheson, Norfolk Wildlife Trust Ambassador said: “With the oldest known fossils dating from 350 million years ago, dragonflies have existed virtually unchanged for almost as long as there have been insects.

“Despite their great antiquity, dragonflies are responding rapidly to climate change.

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“In the past few years our very own Norfolk hawker has expanded its range enormously across Norfolk and elsewhere in southern England.

“At the same time the southern migrant hawker has been spreading from Europe through the southeast of the country.

“With several males seen recently at NWT Thompson Common, it looks likely that this stunning insect will soon join the list of dragonflies and damselflies which regularly breed in the diverse and wonderful wetlands of Norfolk.”


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