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Caught on camera but not in real life - this horribly injured seal is still swimming around

PUBLISHED: 14:45 08 January 2019 | UPDATED: 16:30 08 January 2019

Injured and bloodied this seal is one of at least six animals needing treatment but evading capture along the Norfolk coast Picture: Paul Macro Landscape Photography

Injured and bloodied this seal is one of at least six animals needing treatment but evading capture along the Norfolk coast Picture: Paul Macro Landscape Photography

Paul Macro Landscape Photography

Bloodied and injured, a tight twine cutting into her neck, this seal is still swimming around facing a grim and uncertain future.

The seals along the coast at Winterton Picture: Paul Macro Landscape PhotographyThe seals along the coast at Winterton Picture: Paul Macro Landscape Photography

In all likelihood she will have to be at death’s door until she is caught by volunteer wardens who patrol the shores from Horsey to Winterton.

The young female was snapped by photographer Paul Macro, on a long zoom lens, an upsetting image clearly showing the harm that can be caused by rubbish in our seas.

Posting the picture on social media he said: “I came across this female seal at the Winterton end of the beach last week.

“I immediately located a seal warden from Friends of Horsey Seals who reported it.

The seals along the coast at Winterton Picture: Paul Macro Landscape PhotographyThe seals along the coast at Winterton Picture: Paul Macro Landscape Photography

“I hope by now it will have been rescued.

“My trip to visit these wonderful and beautiful creatures was tarred by finding her, but fingers crossed she has/can be rescued.”

He stressed that all his images were taken on a long zoom lense, so as not to alarm or scare the seals and urged all those visiting to respect their space, and keep all dogs on a short lead.

Alison Charles, manager at the East Winch Wildlife Centre, in Kings Lynn, that usually treats such cases, said that incredibly, given the number of wildlife watchers visiting the colony, they were unaware of this particular animal.

Injured and bloodied this seal is one of at least six animals needing treatment but evading capture along the Norfolk coast Picture: Paul Macro Landscape PhotographyInjured and bloodied this seal is one of at least six animals needing treatment but evading capture along the Norfolk coast Picture: Paul Macro Landscape Photography

“There is fresh blood there and it looks like a really fine nylon netting to me,” she said.

“I just want to get my hands on them all and help them.

“It is frustrating but we do the best we can.”

Mrs Charles said the 2018/2019 breeding system was a record year for injuries involving plastic and rubbish in our seas, notably two of the worst caused by the most simple of plastic playthings - the frisbee.

The charity saw its first victims in 2008. This year it had dealt with the most ever, treating eight patients at its hospital including most recently Mrs Pink Frisbee.

“It is not a huge number but it is certainly going up and we know there are six others on the beach (with injuries).”

“We see it as a reflection of what is out there in the sea and feel it is getting worse.”

She said being such large wild animals with a nasty bite seals were difficult to catch until they became too weak and ill to slip back into the sea.

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