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Only 9p entry on Mothers’ Day as north Norfolk attraction goes back to the 1920s.

PUBLISHED: 12:53 29 February 2016 | UPDATED: 12:53 29 February 2016

Cley Visitor Centre

Cley Visitor Centre

Archant Norfolk 2015

Visitors to a major north Norfolk attraction will be charged the 1920s entry price of 9p on Sunday as it celebrates a special anniversary with national significance.

Nature pioneer Dr Sydney Long, founder of the Norfolk Naturalists Trust (now the Norfolk Wildlife Trust) in 1926. His vision has led to the creation of almost 50 similar organisations around the country.Nature pioneer Dr Sydney Long, founder of the Norfolk Naturalists Trust (now the Norfolk Wildlife Trust) in 1926. His vision has led to the creation of almost 50 similar organisations around the country.

Cley Visitor Centre will be marking 90 years to the day since an important area of land was bought, marking the beginnings of what eventually became the Norfolk Wildlife Trust (NWT).

As well as scrapping its usual non-members’ £5 entry charge for its 1920s equivalent price, the centre will be holding a Roaring ’20s party during the 10am-4pm opening hours.

Staff will be wearing 1920s costumes, a gypsy jazz band will play, and 90th anniversary archives will be on display.

And, as March 6 is Mothers’ Day, a vintage-themed afternoon high tea will be available.

March 6 1926 is a red-letter day in the history of conservation and birdwatching in the UK.

It was the date on which 435 acres of marsh at Cley were bought by 12 men, led by Dr Sydney Long.

Cley Marshes had long been famous for its birdlife and the group agreed to create a trust and give the marshes to it to be preserved.

The trust, originally Norfolk Naturalists Trust, is known today as NWT. It was the foundation of a County Wildlife Trust movement, with Norfolk the first of the 47 trusts that exist today across the UK.

A new public hide, built with Heritage Lottery Fund cash, has been built on the east Bank, part of improved facilities on the nature reserve which also include new circular footpaths and the Simon Aspinall Wildlife Education Centre.

Brendan Joyce, NWT chief executive, said: “We are proud of our role saving Norfolk’s wildlife over such a long time and are delighted to share the spectacle of Cley on March 6 with as many people as possible and hopefully bring a flavour of the 1920s back for everyone to enjoy.”

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