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A one-inch deep wound, underweight and exhausted - seal with rope around its neck rescued

PUBLISHED: 16:31 05 October 2019 | UPDATED: 16:31 05 October 2019

Gypsie, the necklace seal, was rescued in July at Somerton and has spent the last few months being treated at East Winch Wildlife Centre. Photo: David Vyse

Gypsie, the necklace seal, was rescued in July at Somerton and has spent the last few months being treated at East Winch Wildlife Centre. Photo: David Vyse

David Vyse

In terrible pain and severely underweight, Gypsy the seal was found with rope tangled around her neck, too exhausted to move.

The rope which was found around the neck of Gypsie, causing her to have a one-inch deep wound. Photo: East Winch Wildlife CentreThe rope which was found around the neck of Gypsie, causing her to have a one-inch deep wound. Photo: East Winch Wildlife Centre

With no strength to get back to the water, volunteers from the Friends of Horsey Seals took Gypsy to the RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre, near King's Lynn, to be treated for her injuries.

'Necklace seal' is a term used by the RSPCA which refers to a seal that has discarded rubbish caught around its neck.

Gypsy was found in July at Somerton, exhausted, weighing only 40kg, with a severe wound around her neck caused by a rope type net.

Her injury was around one-inch deep and she had to be treated daily with bath salts, antibiotics and oral medication to get her back to good health.

Gypsie, the necklace seal, has spent the last few months being treated at East Winch Wildlife Centre. She was found with rope around her neck causing a one-inch deep wound. Photo: East Winch Wildlife CentreGypsie, the necklace seal, has spent the last few months being treated at East Winch Wildlife Centre. She was found with rope around her neck causing a one-inch deep wound. Photo: East Winch Wildlife Centre

After months of care, Gypsy, along with four other grey seal pups, was finally well enough to be released back into the wild.

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RSPCA centre manager Alison Charles said: "It's always a special moment when you have the privilege of watching a wild animal be released back to the wild where they belong and something I don't think I will ever grow tired of seeing.

"For all the seals that come into our care the road to recovery is usually a long one, as it takes time to build up their strength and get them to an ideal weight where they will be strong enough to survive in the wild."

Among the five seals that were released was 'Icelandic Pony', another necklace seal who had netting caught around her neck and body.

The remaining seals were all pups that had been sick and suffering from a range of health issues including lungworm.

They were all released from a site along the Wash at Sutton Bridge, where they would then make their way back out to Seal Sands.

The RSPCA urges anyone who comes across a seal that has been injured, to not attempt to capture or handle it.

If anyone sees an animal they may have concerns about, contact the RSPCA's emergency line on 0300 1234 999.

For more information on what to do with injured wild animals, visit the RSPCA's website at www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/wildlife/injuredanimals.

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