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'Waste of money, fuel, and everything' - Council's 'pointless' cutting of wild flowers criticised

PUBLISHED: 07:30 19 July 2019 | UPDATED: 11:49 19 July 2019

The verges in Amberley Court during summer, with bees and butterflies abound.

The verges in Amberley Court during summer, with bees and butterflies abound.

Archant

A Lowestoft resident has hit out at the council for wasting resources and harming wildlife with their "pointless" cutting of wild flowers growing on residential pathways.

The same verge outside Rod Fryatt's home in Amberley Court,  'destroyed' by the council.The same verge outside Rod Fryatt's home in Amberley Court, 'destroyed' by the council.

Rod Fryatt, 70, from Amberley Court, called for East Suffolk Council to have more compassion for wildlife and homeowners.

Mr Fryatt, a retired clock repairer, said: "The Council come round here with their machines bringing petrol with fumes and rubbish all over the place.

"It's utterly pointless. All the little bugs need houses, I can understand they cut around road junctions and things as there's a need for that, but what is the point of this?

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"If homeowners want the grass outside the gate cut, they can do it themselves. It's full of insects, butterflies and bees."

Mr Fryatt usually looks forward to high summer in Lowestoft, when hedgerows are in full bloom, but he says he is disapointed when the council "order out the machines and destroy it".

He said: "I don't blame the operators who are only doing their job. They have more compassion and intelligence than their masters and if you point out what they are destroying and ask politely they will often leave you a private nature reserve.

"If we all did this there would be less fuel burnt and a prettier town."

A spokesperson for East Suffolk Council said: "There are often differing views from the public on where grass should and shouldn't be cut and we certainly believe that there are areas where it is important to allow wild growth and encourage bio-dioversity.

"However there is a balance to be struck between wild growth and tidiness or accessibility. Wild growth can also attract littering and that is obviously an environmental issue which we are trying to avoid."

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