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It’s a tall order: Can you help identify East Anglia’s highest peaks?

PUBLISHED: 12:19 05 May 2015

A view over the rooftop's of Sheringham from Beeston Bump. Weybourne and Salthouse can be seen in the distance.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

A view over the rooftop's of Sheringham from Beeston Bump. Weybourne and Salthouse can be seen in the distance. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2013

It would barely register as a foothill in many parts of the world. But at 338ft, Beacon Hill – a moderately taxing ascent for walkers traversing the north Norfolk coast – is the county’s highest summit.

Paraglider over Beeston Bump near Sheringham on Wednesday afternoon. 

Picture: MARK BULLIMOREParaglider over Beeston Bump near Sheringham on Wednesday afternoon. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Click here to view East Anglia’s highest ‘peaks’

As such it is one of several landmarks being identified and chronicled as part of an unlikely new project: to map the region’s greatest heights.

The scheme is the brainchild of Mark Jones, whose aim is to draw attention to, and highlight, the more elevated parts of the region.

Visitors to St James' Hill in Norwich.Visitors to St James' Hill in Norwich.

He has set up a website, on which he writes about the landscape and history of the area, and has invited readers to get involved by providing details about hills in their area.

The region is, to put it mildly, not blessed with the most rugged of landscapes and Norfolk was famously, and rather acidly, dismissed in the Noël Coward play Private Lives as “very flat”.

But proof-reader Mr Jones, 39, who is originally from Cambridge, but now lives in Scotland, hopes his project will dispel some of the myths that exist about quite how level the area is.

“The page is really about exploring and learning more about the landscape and history of East Anglia. I’ve researched and written about a number of these hills already,” he said.

“I’d like to write too about Beacon Hill, the highest point in Norfolk, and various other hills in Norfolk.”

The project has only just got off the ground and follows a bit of teasing from his wife.

He said: “The page began a couple of weeks ago, inspired by a joke between my Scottish wife, Shelagh, and I. She sometimes teases me about how flat East Anglia is in comparison with Greenock, where we now live.

“But when I thought about it, I realised that, actually, East Anglia has rather a lot of hills, and many of them have interesting histories or folklore attached to them. So, I thought that if Scotland has its Munros, maybe East Anglia should lay claim to its own mountain range – the Mundanes.

“I’m very familiar with some of the hills I’ll write about, but I am always incredibly keen to receive suggestions from other people, who can contact me via the page.”

He added: “I hope the page will appeal to people who already know of these places – and perhaps also attract other people who are less familiar with East Anglia.”

In addition to the hills, Mr Jones 
is also writing more general pieces on the page about bits of East Anglian history and mythology.

He said: “Last week I wrote about the artist and businessman, C.A. Hannaford, who began Broads Tours in the 1930s and later produced a self-illustrated booklet, The Charm of the Broads.

“On other days, I write short pieces about famous East Anglians, past and present.”

Log onto www.facebook.com/pages/The-Mundanes-In-Search-of-the-Lost-Mountains-of-East-Anglia/425780014250499 to find out more or to provide Mr Jones with other locations to consider email jarvisjones81@hotmail.com


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