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Gressenhall Farm diary: A week of rare chicks and a mischievous horse loses his shoes

PUBLISHED: 08:51 05 May 2020 | UPDATED: 09:16 05 May 2020

Gressenhall Farm has greeted many new arrivals and this week was no exception with the arrival of Norfolk Grey chicks. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

Gressenhall Farm has greeted many new arrivals and this week was no exception with the arrival of Norfolk Grey chicks. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

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As part of a weekly diary, Gressenhall Farm sees the hatching of some rare chicks and a mischievous horses loses his shoes.

Gressenhall Farm has greeted many new arrivals and this week was no exception with the arrival of Norfolk Grey chicks. Picture: Gressenhall FarmGressenhall Farm has greeted many new arrivals and this week was no exception with the arrival of Norfolk Grey chicks. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

With warmth, sun and a touch of rain the natural flora has started to flourish. The Suffolk Punch horses are enjoying the newly emerging spring grass. With all this excitement, Trojan has managed to lose both of his front shoes!

The Lincoln Longwool lambs are enjoying their adventure out of the barn and into the fields; they are regularly seen skipping and jumping throughout the day.

The first signs of the recently-planted potato plants have started to emerge, and the Large Black piglets are enjoying playing in their water trough. All in all, a busy and bustling week across the farm.

The Suffolk Punch horses are enjoying the newly emerging spring grass. With all this excitement, Trojan has managed to lose both of his front shoes. Picture: Gressenhall FarmThe Suffolk Punch horses are enjoying the newly emerging spring grass. With all this excitement, Trojan has managed to lose both of his front shoes. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

Gressenhall Farm has greeted many new arrivals and this week was no exception with the arrival of Norfolk Grey chicks.

The Norfolk Grey are not known as a sitter, a hen rarely becomes broody to hatch a clutch of eggs by herself.

To help increase hatching rates, eggs are placed inside an incubator. There is always an anxious wait until the sound of chirping and the cracking of eggshells occurs.

The Avenue in Gressenhall Farm. Picture: Gressenhall FarmThe Avenue in Gressenhall Farm. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

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The Norfolk Grey were developed by Fred Myhill of Norwich, Norfolk, between 1910 - 1912. These birds have a black body and silvery-white feathering to the neck (more dominant in male birds). Greys are known to be ‘easy to keep’ because of their gentle nature and regular egg production.

A favourite of ours, and one breed our visitors may have regularly seen on their visit to Gressenhall, is our trio of Millefleur Pekin Bantam chickens.

The Lincoln Longwool lambs are enjoying their adventure out of the barn and into the fields; they are regularly seen skipping and jumping throughout the day. Picture: Gressenhall FarmThe Lincoln Longwool lambs are enjoying their adventure out of the barn and into the fields; they are regularly seen skipping and jumping throughout the day. Picture: Gressenhall Farm

Out of visitor hours, one cockerel and two hens will find the whole of Cherry Tree Cottage Garden to themselves. These chickens are sweet, gentle birds who love a deep hole to have a dust bath in, especially in the middle of the vegetable patch.

Gressenhall staff will know that you must always remember to close the garden gate!

The beginning of May is upon us and with this we look forward to welcoming many more new arrivals. Not just from our resident farm animals but those whom have decided to call Gressenhall ‘home’.

We are lucky enough to host a 50-acre site which provides a habitat for many different species.

From the blue tits that have chosen the Farm House to raise their young, to the roe deer and its fawn that enjoy the surrounding Gressenhall woodland.

Gressenhall is certainly a place for everyone.

•Gressenhall Farm have teamed up with the Eastern Daily Press to bring you a weekly diary of what is going on behind the scenes at the farm


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