Search

‘We have to pay for the privilege’ - the farmers having to fork out to clean up fly-tipping

PUBLISHED: 06:30 18 February 2020 | UPDATED: 08:07 18 February 2020

Fly-tipped waste dumped on land in Filby and Halvergate. PHOTO: Edward Wharton

Fly-tipped waste dumped on land in Filby and Halvergate. PHOTO: Edward Wharton

Archant

A farmer on the east coast has slammed the “worsening problem” of fly-tipping as lorry loads full of rubbish are dumped on private rural land.

Mr Wharton using his personal equipment to clear away fly-tipped waste dumped next to his land. PHOTO: Edward WhartonMr Wharton using his personal equipment to clear away fly-tipped waste dumped next to his land. PHOTO: Edward Wharton

Edward Wharton, a farmer in Stokesby, Filby and Halvergate, said the issue was getting out of hand in the fields adjacent to where he works - adding that he often has to bear the cost of the clean-up himself.

Great Yarmouth Borough Council's policy is to remove waste dumped on public land or highways free of charge, but it does not apply to private land, which becomes a problem for farmers in particular.

Mr Wharton said: "As farmers, we get a lot of waste dumped on our private fields, and the council won't go near that.

"We have to pay for the clean-up with our own equipment, and then pay for the disposal of the waste at the tip - which is very expensive since they upped the charges.

Fly-tipped waste along a public highway in Great Yarmouth. PHOTO: Edward WhartonFly-tipped waste along a public highway in Great Yarmouth. PHOTO: Edward Wharton

"Having to clean up other people's mess is annoying, but not undoable. The annoying bit is having to pay for that privilege.

"The only hope of catching the person is if they accidentally leave a personal document behind."

According to Mr Wharton, the spike in fly-tipping is due to prices at the county's tips and recycling centres, which he says encourages people to do anything "to dodge official charges".

But Joe Hull, head of waste at Norfolk County Council, said: "The changes to charges at recycling centres have not led to the sharp increase in fly-tipping that many feared and did deliver the savings expected."

Fly-tipped waste along a public highway in Great Yarmouth, blocking traffic from passing through. PHOTO: Edward WhartonFly-tipped waste along a public highway in Great Yarmouth, blocking traffic from passing through. PHOTO: Edward Wharton

Yet some agree that the county council's decision to charge for even small amounts of waste disposal - which used to be free - is making fly-tipping a more attractive option.

You may also want to watch:

Justine Davis, from Martham, who uses the tip regularly, said: "I think the council should offer a membership fee for waste disposal for the whole year - then you could go back and use it as many times as you need.

"We used the Caister tip just before Christmas, and it cost nearly £30 to drop off an old shower screen, two bags of rubble and some garden waste and guttering.

"We are on income support at the minute and when you're really struggling with money I can honestly see why you might be pushed to fly-tipping."

The borough council declined to comment and said it is not responsible for the household recycling centre, but said "if a land owner is suffering from repeated-fly tipping and has evidence, environmental services will investigate where they can".


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press