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Seriously cute kids set to join Cromer’s famous Bagot goats this summer

PUBLISHED: 16:22 13 March 2020 | UPDATED: 18:01 13 March 2020

Mark Frosdick, animal control officer for the North Norfolk District Council, with a couple of the Bagot goat kids, born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Mark Frosdick, animal control officer for the North Norfolk District Council, with a couple of the Bagot goat kids, born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

These kids are seriously cute and they will soon be making their way to join the famous Bagot goat herd on the cliffs of Cromer.

A couple of the Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYA couple of the Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Fourteen new arrivals have joined the district's most popular four-legged residents, while they enjoy a break away from their habitat management work, at Wiveton Hall.

The 10 nanny goats have had 14 kids and Mark Frosdick, animal control officer at North Norfolk District Council (NNDC), said: 'They've been at Wiveton Hall since last week and they started kidding on Saturday, March 7.

'They were at Salthouse before that, on their winter break. Their return to Cromer will depend on the vegetation and weather, but, hopefully, it will be in May or June.'

The Bagot goats have become huge tourist attractions in Cromer and they are also used for conservation grazing by the National Trust and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust.

One of Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYOne of Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Mr Frosdick added: 'The oldest goat we have here is about 11. We had one die last year who was 16. We don't give many of the goats names, as it would take too long, but we have named Delilah, Lucy and 99.'

He said the goats were very hardy and fairly low maintenance.

'When we are kidding we need to be here, but once they've kidded, I just come twice a day to feed and water them,' he added.

'They eat brambles, docks, stinging nettles, grassy and woody vegetation and ivy. They are one of the oldest breed of goats in England and have survived since the 1300s.'

One of the Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYOne of the Bagot goat kids born in the last few days at Wiveton Hall, which will go on Cromer cliffs in the summer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The first kids born as part of the district council's Bagot goat-breeding programme arrived last year.

The Bagots, which are listed as 'vulnerable' by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust, first arrived in 2016.

The herd was originally brought in to help keep the cliff at Cromer clear. They spend the summer months frolicking on the slopes of the west cliffs and have their own themed merchandise, with proceeds re-invested in the project.

NNDC leader Sarah Bütikofer said: 'I'm delighted we had another successful breeding season and that the goats will soon be able to return to Cromer, to help us with the control of the cliff vegetation.'

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