Emotional service held in Norwich to honour the memories of little lives lost

Lizzie Woolnough who spoke at the Doorway of Hope service organised by TimeNorfolk. PIC: Peter Walsh

Lizzie Woolnough who spoke at the Doorway of Hope service organised by TimeNorfolk. PIC: Peter Walsh - Credit: Archant

It is a devastating event you never come to terms with.

Lizzie Woolnough in front of candles lit at the Doorway of Hope service organised by TimeNorfolk. PI

Lizzie Woolnough in front of candles lit at the Doorway of Hope service organised by TimeNorfolk. PIC: Peter Walsh - Credit: Archant

But those united in grief at the loss of a baby came together to light a candle in memory of the little ones whose lives they never got to share at an emotional service in Norwich.

The annual Doorway of Hope Service was held at Norwich Cathedral in remembrance for all who have lost a baby, however long ago, through miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, termination, stillbirth as well as during the early months of life.

Lizzie Woolnough, 34, was one of more than 50 people attending the event, which was organised by TimeNorfolk, which supports those who have experienced pregnancy loss.

Mrs Woolnough bravely shared her own heartbreaking story of the loss of her son Beau.


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Beau, an identical twin, had to be terminated to allow his brother, Wilfred, the chance to survive following a diagnosis of Twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

Mrs Woolnough, who lives near Halesworth with her husband Ben, 34, and Wilfred, who is now two-and-a-half, said the event gave people the chance to come together in grief.

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She said: 'I just think it's important to have a space to grieve.'

She also hoped that by talking about her loss she could honour Beau's memory and help others too.

During the poignant service, which also included readings and hymns, Lesley Bradfield, from TimeNorfolk, said: 'We're all here together to honour the memories of the little ones that we've lost.

'Lives have changed forever, touched by a child who lived on in our hearts.

'Not only has a child been lost but our hopes, dreams and plans for the future have also been lost.

'It's huge. It has a great ripple effect and it affects the whole family not just the individual.'

Linda Barden, 70, from Harleston, was 26 when she lost her first son, Andrew, when he was just hours old.

The mother of two other sons said she felt guilty ever since but has been helped by TimeNorfolk who 'changed my life'.

She spoke at last year's event and said: 'My motto is if I can help one person I have achieved something.'

The service, which was held tonight (Thursday, October 19), also gave people a chance to write a message in a book of remembrance.

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