Norfolk teachers, unions and parents to attend lobby at parliament over school funding crisis today

Scott Lyons, joint National Education Union spokesperson for Norfolk. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Scott Lyons, joint National Education Union spokesperson for Norfolk. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

Norfolk teachers, parents and unions will attend a lobby at parliament today over school funding.

West Earlham Junior School, new longhouse. Picture by Martin George

West Earlham Junior School, new longhouse. Picture by Martin George - Credit: Archant

More than 1,000 people from around the country are expected to join the event in London, which has been organised by the School Cuts campaign.

Members of the Norfolk National Education Union (NEU) will be attending and have asked to speak to Clive Lewis, MP for Norwich South, Peter Aldous, MP for Waveney, and Sandy Martin, MP for Ipswich.

Concerns centre on the school funding crisis, which has seen school budgets become more stretched than ever.

Scott Lyons, joint NEU Norfolk spokesperson, said: 'It is quite unthinkable that a Government would want our schools to be anything other than properly funded. Yet this is the position the majority of schools find themselves in.'

The School Cuts campaign provides data on how much schools are likely to lose out on financially, and what this equates to per pupil.


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Bob Groome, fellow joint NEU spokesperson, said: 'Headteachers are at the end of their tether with many having to take the unprecedented step of writing home to parents to ask for money to help with the running of the school.'

At today's lobby, 400 constituencies around England and Wales will be represented, with attendees calling on MPs to demand that the chancellor releases more funds for schools.

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Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) and former Suffolk headteacher, said the union welcomed the government's new national funding formula for schools, which is designed to distribute school cash more evenly.

But he said: 'Slicing up the cake more evenly cannot disguise the fact that the cake is not big enough in the first place. The overall level of education funding is a long way short of what is needed.'

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