New logo for East Norfolk high school makes use of county emblems

Pupils from the student leadership team at Flegg High School in Martham showing off the schools new

Pupils from the student leadership team at Flegg High School in Martham showing off the schools new image and branding.Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

A rooted reed bed and pair of soaring birds are helping to invigorate the image and ethos at a flourishing Norfolk high school.

Principal Dr Simon Fox outside Flegg High School in Martham showing off the schools new image and br

Principal Dr Simon Fox outside Flegg High School in Martham showing off the schools new image and branding.Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

The sleek modern logo replaces a wherry which for 50 years had been the emblem at Flegg High School - a business and enterprise academy - in Martham.

According to new principal Dr Simon Fox the long over-due re-brand has broad appeal and wide relevance among the 876 pupils who feel rooted in Norfolk but want to fly high.

He said that while most of the children held the wherry logo in high affection, many thought it was a yacht and - like most people outside the county - did not appreciate its Broadland connections.

The current image - devised by an agency with help from the student leadership team - was more 'coporate' carrying the threads of professionalism through school into the world of work.


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Featuring a reed bed, birds and water - symbolising the flow of youngsters through the school - the image marks a new era for the school with twitter feeds, a revamped reception and website, and a range of technical improvements helping it to keep pace.

Dr Fox said the transition had gone 'surprisingly smoothly' with supportive parents and positive feedback from the website.

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Running alongside the re-brand is a tough new uniform policy aimed at putting the focus on learning not fashion and freeing teachers from the onerous and sometimes inappropriate task of judging what was suitable.

'One of the things that was obvious when I joined in January was that the school was ready for a move to the next phase and a new ethos and image to give the children a different outlook on the world.

'It's a really good job, professionally done. We did not want to end up with a logo that was not as good as the previous one.

'The wherry was a lovely traditional image but most of the children did not even know what it was. A lot of our teachers go out and present beyond the county and unless you know what a wherry looks like you would never know that we are a school in middle of the Broads. What came out was that they have a commitment to Norfolk and like being in Norfolk.

'When they go out into the wider world they have to be able to compete and the world is very challenging. We want empoyers to look at an applicant from Flegg High School and know they will have that ethos.'

Although the outlay was 'not extravagant' the benefits were already being reaped in terms of the feel of the school and what the students could take from it, Dr Fox added.

Head girl Beth Willoughby, 15, from Rollesby, who wans to become a doctor, said: 'With the logo the senior leadership team all got together and discussed words we though would describe Flegg. We were all proud of the fact that we come from Norfolk and really wanted to incorporate that. I had the old logo for four years but having a change has been really positive.'

As part of the re-brand the school chose six key words to spur the school community: ambition, inspiration, encouragement creativity, support and determination.

The school celebrates 50 years next year and is planning a string of events.

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