Is the end nearing for the traditional school nativity? Tell us what you think

Youngsters from Oulton Broad Primary school take part in a special Nativity and Christmas Carol serv

Youngsters from Oulton Broad Primary school take part in a special Nativity and Christmas Carol service at St Michael's Church. - Credit: Nick Butcher

A new survey claims schools are phasing out the traditional Christmas nativity - but is that the case in Norfolk and Suffolk?

Youngsters from Earsham Primary school reception class take part in the School Nativity.

Youngsters from Earsham Primary school reception class take part in the School Nativity. - Credit: Nick Butcher

The research, from Netmums, reveals that traditional nativity plays are being ditched in favour of pop songs and punk fairies.

They claim only a third of schools now hold a traditional nativity play at Christmas time. The most common school Christmas celebration (for more than half of all schools) is now an 'updated nativity' with modern characters including recycling bins, footballers and punk fairies.

The show is not even called the nativity anymore with many schools calling it a 'Winter Celebration' 'Seasonal Play' or 'End of Year Concert' instead, it is claimed.

New modern Christmas plays have a whole host of characters so that instead of shepherds and angels children are just as likely to be cast as aliens, recycling bins, a Sir Alan Sugar-style 'Lord Christmas', punk fairies, Elvis, footballers, a lobster, a napkin, carrots, sprouts, a pumpkin and a drunken spaceman.


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But despite its decline, there is overwhelming pressure from parents to continue the tradition of a Christmas Nativity play. Almost two thirds (65pc) of parents whose school doesn't hold a traditional nativity would like it to, with just one in five (22pc) feeling the Nativity is 'unimportant'. A further 13pc planned to teach their child the Christmas story at home.

What's it like at your school? Let us know in the comment section below.

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