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‘It blows your mind’ - Your intestines in knitted form

PUBLISHED: 11:08 20 June 2020 | UPDATED: 11:08 20 June 2020

Anne Hobson, a science technician at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, as knitted the human intestines to help students appreciate their enormous size Picture: ENSF

Anne Hobson, a science technician at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, as knitted the human intestines to help students appreciate their enormous size Picture: ENSF

Archant

At first glance it looks like a weird and wonderful exhibit vying for top honours at a Turner prize exhibition.

Anne Hobson, a science technician at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, as knitted the human intestines to help students appreciate their enormous size Picture: ENSFAnne Hobson, a science technician at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, as knitted the human intestines to help students appreciate their enormous size Picture: ENSF

And in common with the artistic creations pored over by critics, the bundle of wool scrunched in a heap does have something to say - and more importantly to teach.

For Anne Hobson, science technician at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, in Gorleston, has knitted the whole of the human small intestine entirely to scale and with all its various parts in a bid to show students how big it actually is.

College principal Dr Catherine Richards said: “This is a really fun and tactile way of approaching what is going on.

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“It is surprising its actual size which is why it is so good for students to see it like this.

“It blows your mind.”

The small intestine is some 5m long - as tall as a giraffe - running from the stomach to the large intestine. Its main job is to absorb nutrients and water from digested food.

The word “small” refers to its width of around 2.5cm.

“Anne is a huge talent - a scientist, and incredibly creative,” Dr Richards added.


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