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High school's breakfast club is prepping pupils for exam success

PUBLISHED: 17:39 24 April 2019 | UPDATED: 08:02 25 April 2019

Head boy, Tom Johnson and head girl, Grace Molenaar enjoying the free breakfast provided by Archbishop Sancroft High School to help students prepare for their GCSEs. Picture: Ella Wilkinson

Head boy, Tom Johnson and head girl, Grace Molenaar enjoying the free breakfast provided by Archbishop Sancroft High School to help students prepare for their GCSEs. Picture: Ella Wilkinson

Archant

Breakfast is said to be the most important meal of the day - and even more so for children preparing for exams.

Head boy, Tom Johnson and head girl, Grace Molenaar enjoying the free breakfast provided by Archbishop Sancroft High School to help students prepare for their GCSEs. Picture: Ella WilkinsonHead boy, Tom Johnson and head girl, Grace Molenaar enjoying the free breakfast provided by Archbishop Sancroft High School to help students prepare for their GCSEs. Picture: Ella Wilkinson

A high school in south Norfolk is helping its pupils ensure they are properly fuelled for their GCSEs this summer with a breakfast club.

Archbishop Sancroft High School in Harleston launched the breakfast club three years ago to help students who were missing out on breakfast – and sometimes dinner – at home.

For its third year, the school has beefed up the breakfast club's offering, partnering with local organisations including the Broken Egg farm shop, Pepperell's Meats, Waveney food bank and Waveney Valley IFA, as well as original supporter the East of England Co-op.

Emma Johnson, school support manager, said: “Some of our more vulnerable students will come into school not having had a proper dinner or any breakfast. That is where it started, learning the number of kids who do not have breakfast and how it affects their performance.”

All the sponsors of Harleston's free GCSE breakfast. From left to right: David Bullard, Paul Burnham and Lee Disney from the Waveney Valley IFA limited. Nathalie Renaut from the Broken Egg cafe. Steve Charlton from the East of England Co-op. Matthew Scade from Waveney Foodbank. Chris and Daniel Pepperell from Pepperells meats and Kevin Renaut from the Broken Egg cafe. Picture: Ella WilkinsonAll the sponsors of Harleston's free GCSE breakfast. From left to right: David Bullard, Paul Burnham and Lee Disney from the Waveney Valley IFA limited. Nathalie Renaut from the Broken Egg cafe. Steve Charlton from the East of England Co-op. Matthew Scade from Waveney Foodbank. Chris and Daniel Pepperell from Pepperells meats and Kevin Renaut from the Broken Egg cafe. Picture: Ella Wilkinson

But she said the breakfasts are about more than bacon and beans. “It creates a bit of camaraderie. The students are there talking with their revision cards out and a teacher on hand to give them last-minute tips.”

Head of school Rob Connelly said 80pc to 85pc of year 11 students had attended the pre-exam breakfast club in previous years.

“The students are reassured that they have that safety net so they can spend time talking to each other and the staff, but also they can sit down and have a civilised breakfast and take that stress away,” he said.

Head boy Tom Johnson, 15, said: “It is really important for both physical and mental wellbeing and health especially in such a stressful period.”

The staff at the Broken Egg Cafe who sponser the free breakfasts. From front to back: Sylvia Reeve, Reanne Coleman, Charlotte Watts, Kevin Renaut, Charlie Keely and Nathalie Renaut. Picture: Ella WilkinsonThe staff at the Broken Egg Cafe who sponser the free breakfasts. From front to back: Sylvia Reeve, Reanne Coleman, Charlotte Watts, Kevin Renaut, Charlie Keely and Nathalie Renaut. Picture: Ella Wilkinson

Head girl Grace Molenaar, 16, added: “Everyone has a different family situation and background so it is good for the school to offer that extra bit of support.”

The Waveney food bank already donates cereals and jam to around 30 schools for breakfast clubs.

Manager Matthew Scade said: “Locally one in every 10 households is living in some kind of poverty, be it food or fuel. About 30pc of our clients are in work but living paycheck to paycheck.”

Chris Pepperell, of Pepperell's Meats, said: “There are a lot of different ways of life out there and to support children to make sure they get their through exams in the best condition possible is so important.”

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