‘Oh, puh-lease’ - Spot the Spongebob Squarepants character on this stone

Found by Michelle Smith's on the north Norfolk coast, a limestone with the distinct appearance of a

Found by Michelle Smith's on the north Norfolk coast, a limestone with the distinct appearance of a beloved childrens character - Squidward from Spongebob Squarepants. Pictures: MICHELLE SMITH - Credit: MICHELLE SMITH

The 'dragon scale' fossil hunter has scored a hat-trick after discovering another unique item in as many weeks.

Michelle Smith, who has become know as the 'dragon scale' fossil hunter, has found a limestone which

Michelle Smith, who has become know as the 'dragon scale' fossil hunter, has found a limestone which has a Spongebob Squarepants character's face on it. Picture: MICHELLE SMITH - Credit: Archant

Michelle Smith, of Rectory Road in Edgefield, near Holt, hit the headlines recently after digging up a fossil with the appearance of a mythical dragon's scale as well as a two-million-year-old mammoth pelvis .

And now, during one of her latest expeditions to the north Norfolk coast, she has brought home a limestone with the distinct appearance of a beloved children's character - Squidward from Spongebob Squarepants.

She initially thought it was flint but after sharing it with members of the Facebook group, Norfolk fossil finds (uk), it was found to be an erratic carboniferous limestone with brachiopod sections.

Ms Smith has previously praised the group for its support since taking-up the hobby last year and this time was no exception.

Squidward in The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (2004). Picture: Paramount Pictures/IMDB

Squidward in The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (2004). Picture: Paramount Pictures/IMDB - Credit: Paramount Pictures/IMDB

She said: "All of the group is so helpful and don't mind my playful side."


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Michelle Smith (pictured), 49, of Edgefield, when she stumbled across a two-million-year-old woolly

Michelle Smith (pictured), 49, of Edgefield, when she stumbled across a two-million-year-old woolly mammoth pelvis on West Runton. Picture: DOUG STUART PHOTOGRAPHER - Credit: Archant

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