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Would you like to be in charge of Dippy the dinosaur's visit to Norwich?

PUBLISHED: 15:06 07 February 2019 | UPDATED: 09:08 08 February 2019

Dippy the diplodocus on tour at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. The skeleton is coming to Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Dippy the diplodocus on tour at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. The skeleton is coming to Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Do you have a passion for project management - and palaeontology?

Dippy the diplodocus at the Natural History Museum. The skeleton is coming to Norwich Cathedral in 2020 on its UK-wide tour. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History MuseumDippy the diplodocus at the Natural History Museum. The skeleton is coming to Norwich Cathedral in 2020 on its UK-wide tour. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Then Norwich Cathedral may have the ideal job for you.

The landmark is on the hunt for a project manager to oversee the arrival and display of one of the world’s most famous skeletons, Dippy the dinosaur, which is set to arrive in the fine city in 2020 as part of a UK-wide tour.

Norwich Cathedral will be the final stop on the three-year tour, where the 26m-long diplodocus skeleton will be on show in the nave from July 11 to October 31.

A job description for the new project manager says they will have to liaise with the cathedral’s Dippy planning group, which has been formed to look at education, exhibitions, marketing and enterprise opportunities.

The Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, and Dr Phil Smith, in the Norwich Cathedral Nave where the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, will be standing when it arrives in 2020 during it's national tour. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYThe Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, and Dr Phil Smith, in the Norwich Cathedral Nave where the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, will be standing when it arrives in 2020 during it's national tour. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

They will also be responsible for co-ordinating a diary of “Dippy related events” to take place in 2020.

Cathedral staff have already been looking at logistics such as visitor management, educational activities and ticketing and the project manager will have to work with administrative, marketing, retail and refectory staff during their tenure to lead the “practical organisation” of these aspects.

They will also have the chance to visit other venues on the Dippy tour, which is currently in Glasgow and is scheduled to stop in Newcastle, Cardiff and Rochdale before coming to Norwich.

Ideas for projects to develop alongside the main exhibition include a sleepover, dining or drinks reception with Dippy at the cathedral, as well as a Dippy puppet to promote the exhibition and a Dippy musical.

Dr Phil Smith, co-ordinator of the Teacher's Scientist Network, talks about the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, coming to the Norwich Cathedral. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYDr Phil Smith, co-ordinator of the Teacher's Scientist Network, talks about the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, coming to the Norwich Cathedral. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

It is also hoped that natural history and science events will take place around the city to coincide with the exhibition.

The project manager will also have to help recruit and manage the Dippy volunteer team – the cathedral currently has a pool of more than 500 volunteers but expects more will be needed.

The post runs from May 2019 to December 2020. From May to December 2019 it is expected to be a part-time role (14 hours a week), rising to full-time (35 hours a week) from January to November 2020.

Dippy’s visit has enabled to cathedral to engage with partners in Norwich including both universities, Norwich Research Park, the Forum, National Writing Centre and Norwich Business Improvement District (BID).

Diplodocus head at the Natural History Museum. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History MuseumDiplodocus head at the Natural History Museum. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

The Very Revd Jane Hedges, Dean of Norwich, said: “We are looking for somebody with lots of relevant experience, drive and enthusiasm to join our committed team and play a key role in the planning and organisation of Dippy’s four-month stay with us here at the cathedral.”

Dippy on Tour

Dippy is not actually a skeleton – he is a plaster-cast, made up of nearly 300 pieces, based on sauropod bones discovered in Wyoming in 1898.

He was painstakingly dismantled and removed from his home at the Natural History Museum in London in 2017, where he had wowed visitors in the grand entrance hall for 112 years.

Norwich Cathedral. Picture: Mike PageNorwich Cathedral. Picture: Mike Page

The first stop on Dippy’s three-year tour was the Dorset County Museum on the Jurassic Coast and he has since been to Birmingham and Belfast.

He will be delivered to Norwich in multiple boxes and will take the best part of a week to reconstruct.

He will go on display in the nave in Norwich Cathedral and tickets to his exhibition will be free, in-keeping with the cathedral’s current free admission policy.

The replacement exhibition at the Natural History Museum is the real skeleton of a young blue whale which died in the British Isles in 1891.

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