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‘It’s like a ghost town’: Seaside streets remain quiet on first weekend of lockdown

PUBLISHED: 08:13 08 November 2020 | UPDATED: 08:54 10 November 2020

Quiet Cromer as a few people are out and about during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Quiet Cromer as a few people are out and about during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2020

The sun shone down on Cromer and Sheringham on the first weekend of lockdown, but despite the good weather, the beaches and streets remained quiet.

Mike and Trisha Millman, from North Repps said they thought Cromer was quite on the first Saturday of lockdown. Picture: StaffMike and Trisha Millman, from North Repps said they thought Cromer was quite on the first Saturday of lockdown. Picture: Staff

In Cromer, Trisha, 68, and Mike Millman, 69, said they thought the town was very quiet but were concerned that second home owners might have come to the area.

They said: “I’m not too worried, I’m just disappointed that people are still [coming to their second homes]. We saw it in the last lockdown.

The couple, who live in Northrepps and were in Cromer to visit the opticians, said they were surprised by how many businesses were open.

Mrs Millman said: “I’m quite surprised so many cafes are doing takeaway: last time there was only Costa, The Rock Shop and Crab Pot Cafe.”

Quiet Cromer as a few people are out and about during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYQuiet Cromer as a few people are out and about during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Sally Townley, the manager of Huckleberries on Church Street, one of the cafes open for takeaways in Cromer, said: “We’ve had a few customers out and about but it’s quiet. I do think it’s just people popping out to Co-Op, dog walkers etc.

“Everyone that has come has been very positive. I think people are a bit more relaxed this time than before.”

Rose Votier, 76, from Cromer, out on the Pier on Saturday, said: “It’s much quieter, much better than it’s been, it’s been mad all summer, there’s a calmness about town [today].

“I think people are more relaxed in that we know it’s the second time around. The council has been more relaxed. They shut down the pier last time, but they haven’t done that now.

Quiet Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYQuiet Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

“So far it’s not so busy so maybe [people] are heeding the government advice,” she said.

In Sheringham, Maria and Jeff Herman, visiting the town from Hindringham, said they thought it was very quiet.

They said: “It feels like a ghost town. The economics for the shops is terrible.”

Jade Shackcloth, enjoying a walk on the beach with her husband and daughter, said there were more people out than she expected.

Huckleberries café manager Sally Townley, left, and Belle Finch, doing takeaways in Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYHuckleberries café manager Sally Townley, left, and Belle Finch, doing takeaways in Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

She said: “The town is busy. I regularly come to Sheringham. I came two weeks before lockdown and there was hardly anyone about. It’s a really nice day but it does seem quite busy - I think people are social distancing though.”

Rose Votier in Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYRose Votier in Cromer during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Maria and Jeff Herman from Hindringham enjoy Sheringham during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYMaria and Jeff Herman from Hindringham enjoy Sheringham during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Quiet Sheringham during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYQuiet Sheringham during the first weekend of the second lockdown. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY


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